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h, of the Illinois Sixteenth, near Monroe station, thirty miles west of Hannibal, Mo., embracing 300 of the Iowa Third, 200 of the Illinois Sixteenth, and about 100 of the Hannibal Home Guards, was attacked by 1,600 secessionists, under Brigadier-General Harris. Although the Federals were surprised, they repelled the attack, drove the rebels back, killed four, and wounded several, besides capturing five prisoners and seven horses. Harris retreated to Monroe, where another skirmish occurred,Harris retreated to Monroe, where another skirmish occurred, in which the rebels were again repulsed. Smith then took up a position and sent messengers for reinforcements from Quincy.--Baltimore American, July 12.--(Doc. 76 1/2.) The Seventh Massachusetts Regiment, under command of Colonel D. N. Couch, left Taunton, Mass., this afternoon for the seat of war.--N. Y. Evening Post, July 10. The New Orleans True Delta of to-day has two characteristic articles, containing bold denunciations of the rebel leaders. One refers to the contemplated asse
illery was of longer range, and did considerable execution. The fight lasted until dusk, and the last shot from the Federal side dismounted one of the rebels' guns. Just at that imminent Governor Wood, of Illinois, fell on their rear with the cavalry sent from Quincy and completely routed them, taking seventy-five prisoners, one gun, and a large number of horses. About twenty or thirty rebels were killed. Not one of the Unionists was killed, although several were severely wounded. General Tom Harris, the rebel leader, escaped.--Chicago Tribune, July 12. The New Orleans Delta, of this day, says that further persistence of the Confederate States in the endeavor to obtain the recognition of our nationality is useless. It also says that the British Ministry have not the courage nor the inclination to apply to the Confederate States the rules which they have uniformly applied to other nations. It adds: Too much importance has been assigned to the idea that France and England wou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
f brother J. F. to Miss Bailey, and wrote a congratulatory letter. April 20. The counterpart of yesterday, rainy and disagreeable. April 21. Uneventful. April 22. Visited old friends in Gordon's and Doles' Georgia brigades. Saw Lieut. Tom Harris, of 12th Georgia, who promised to preach to 12th Alabama next Sunday. Wrote out a recommendation and obtained the signatures of every officer in the regiment for the appointment of Billy Moore as Chaplain of the regiment, and presented it and 15. Traveled to Virginia with Mr. and Mrs. Tinsley and family, of Big Lick, and Miss Sallie H., of Ala., and enjoyed their company. August 16. Left Richmond with Captain Weeks, of 4th Ga., for Orange C. H. Heard Dr. Powledge and Lieutenant Tom Harris, of 12th Georgia, preach. August 17. Officer of the guard. August 18. Visited Colonel Cullen A. Battle, of 3d Alabama. August 19, 20 and 21. Latter is Fast Day, proclaimed by President Davis. I fasted until afternoon. Augu
The war in Missouri. St. Louis, Sept. 14. --Gen. Raines is reported to be 40 miles from Lexington with 15,000 men. Tom Harris has captured a Government Agent in Boone county, and took from him a number of horses. Intelligence from Hudson, Missouri, states that Martin Green had crossed the Missouri at Glasgow with 3,500 men, and seized the steamer Sunshine, and used her for transporting troops. He captured a guard of 14 Federals, and released a number of Secession prisoners. The Sunshine was laden with bacon, sugar, &c., and 600 stand of arms. [second Dispatch.] St. Louis, Sept. 14. --Gen. Price's advance guard is at Warrensburg. Price claims to have 16,000 in his main body, and is approaching Lexington. The same messenger brought Price's official account of the battle at Fort Scott on the 4th of September. The forces under Gens. Lane and Montgomery, at the Junction, retreated after a skirmish of an hour and a half. Price's loss was 3 killed and
Jefferson City, that 1,000 mounted men are stationed at Kinkead's Mills, fourteen miles north of Columbia; that Martin Green was between the junction of Hannibal and St. Joseph and North Missouri Roads, with 3,000 men; and that "Military Bill" Harris was to join Green and take Columbia the night of the 11th inst. Pickets were seen three miles north of Columbia. A bank is located in that town. Mr. Smith, a Government agent for the purchase of horses, was taken prisoner by Harris and $1re stationed at Kinkead's Mills, fourteen miles north of Columbia; that Martin Green was between the junction of Hannibal and St. Joseph and North Missouri Roads, with 3,000 men; and that "Military Bill" Harris was to join Green and take Columbia the night of the 11th inst. Pickets were seen three miles north of Columbia. A bank is located in that town. Mr. Smith, a Government agent for the purchase of horses, was taken prisoner by Harris and $1,200 and all his horses taken from him.
e taken control of the municipal affairs of the corporation, preventing egress and ingress of both goods and travelers. They have also levied heavy contributions on several stores, taking just what they want. From all we can learn the Union men and their property in St. Joseph and the surrounding country are completely in the hands of the rebels, and demand the immediate interposition of the Federal arms to save them from annihilation. A Northern Rumor. St. Louis. Sept. 14. --Tom Harris, with 1,000 men, crossed the Missouri river at Artien crook on Tuesday last, bound for Price's army. Six hundred Secessionists, under Col. Hull, were marching towards Glasgow on Wednesday to cross the river and join Martin Green. The rebel camp at Deck creek, in Monroe county, was broken up by the Federals on Sunday last, and it is reported that 300 rebels were captured. Another rebel camp was broken up at Spenceburg, Parke county, on Monday, and sixteen prisoners were taken. Anoth
Chair announced the following as the select joint committees on oysters, freedmen and emigration, in pursuance of Senate joint resolution: Committee on Oysters.--Messrs. Seawell, Garnett, Braxton, Straughan, Purdy, Smith, Bekem, Thompson, J. S. Davison, Towns, Wyatt and Lee. Committee on Emigration.--Messrs. Herndon, Cabell, Waddell, Owen and Stearns. Committee to Confer with the Superintendent of the Freedmen's Bureau. --Messrs. Atkinson, English, Brown, Mosby, Rixey, Holmes, Harris, Graves, J. McD. Taylor and Hardy. Mr. Wall, from the Committee on Privileges and Elections, reported as follows: Resolved. That J. H. C. Jones is entitled to a seat on the floor of the House of Delegates as the member elect from the district composed of the counties of King and Queen and King William, in the place of T. J. Christian, the sitting member. After debate, in which both contestants were heard, the report of the committee was received and the resolution agreed to.
Throwing rocks. --A little darkey, named Tom Harris, was yesterday taken up by the police for assaulting Harrison Scott with rocks.
Proceedings of Congress. Washington, Monday, December 11. --Senate.--The President pro tempore announced the following committee to act with the House committee on the subject of Mr. Lincoln's death; Messrs. Foot, Yates, Fessenden. Wilson, Doolittle, Lane of Kansas. Harris, Nesmith, Lane, Wiley, Buckalow and Henderson. Mr. Nye gave notice of a bill to change the eastern boundary of the State of Nevada so as to include additional territory, to be taken from Utah and Arizona; and also of a bill for the speedy completion of the Pacific railroad. At 1 o'clock, P. M. the Senate adjourned. House.--Mr. Bland, of Maine, introduced a resolution for the reimbursement to the loyal States of advances made and debts contracted by them for the preservation of the Union. Referred to a special committee of seven members. Mr. Elliott, of Massachusetts, introduced a joint resolution, which was referred to a select committee of fifteen, declaring the condition of the Stat
Insurrection. --We hear that the County Court of Spotsylvania has expressed to General Harris its fears of a negro insurrection during Christmas. General Harris will, we learn, take prompt measures to repress any disturbance, should one occur, but does not share the apprehensions felt by the Court.--Fredericksburg Ledger. Insurrection. --We hear that the County Court of Spotsylvania has expressed to General Harris its fears of a negro insurrection during Christmas. General Harris will, we learn, take prompt measures to repress any disturbance, should one occur, but does not share the apprehensions felt by the Court.--Fredericksburg Ledger.
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