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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harris, William Torrey 1835- (search)
Harris, William Torrey 1835- Educator; born in North Killingly, Conn., Sept. 10, 1835; studied in Yale University, but did not graduate. During 1857-67 he was principal and assistant superintendent in the St. Louis public schools; in the latter year was appointed superintendent, but in 1880 was forced by ill health to resign. In 1880 he was a delegate from the United States bureau of education to the international congress of educators in Brussels. On Sept. 13, 1889, he became United Sf educators in Brussels. On Sept. 13, 1889, he became United States commissioner of education. Dr. Harris founded in St. Louis the Journal of speculative Philosophy in 1867, and in 1901 was still conducting it. He was chief editor of Appleton's series of School readers, and editor of Appleton's Educational series. His other publications include: Introduction to the study of Philosophy; Hegel's logic; Critical expositions; and Psychologic foundations of education. See education, elementary.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
which made itself strongly felt in the work of William T. Harris, was even more potent in Great Britain. In obly represented scientific empiricism, and of William T. Harris, the saintly and practical minded Hegelian, un James. To the modem reader the writings of William T. Harris— even his last and most finished book, Psycholcerian evolutionary philosophy, so the work of William T. Harris may be summed up as an attack against agnosticboth owed much of their impulse to philosophy to W. T. Harris. Howison proved one of the most successful and r total population. In the field of education William T. Harris and after him Dewey have undoubtedly exerted p this field, chiefly under the leadership of Dr. William T. Harris, See also Book III, Chap. XVII. United S Porter, who had now associated with himself William Torrey Harris; and in 1909 the seventh edition—the New international—entirely remade, was published by Harris as editor-in-chief, and F. Sturges Allen who had been on <
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
rdy, Thomas, 316 Harlan, Justice, 360 Harland, Henry, 91 Harmony of interests, the, 435 Harper, Chancellor, 338 Harper, Fletcher, 309 Harper, J. H., 547 n. Harper, W. R., 207, 468 Harper's Latin Dictionary, 463 Harper's magazine, 4, 5, 80, 81, 83, 114, 126, 150, 301, 304, 307-10, 311, 312, 313, 316 Harper's weekly, 325, 326, 334 Harrigan, E., 272, 278 Harriman, E. H., 167 Harris, George, 210 Harris, George W., 53 Harris, Joel Chandler, 12, 86, 89, 316, 615 Harris, W. T., 228, 230, 236-39, 247 n., 254, 265, 422, 477, 478 Harrisse, Henry, 184-85 Harrison, Gessner, 460, 477 Harrower, John, 389 Hart (Carey & Hart), 544 Hart H. and J., 582 Hart Tony, 272 Harte Bret, 4, 7, 31, 53, 53 n., 56, 59, 68, 73, 85, 86, 89, 99, 154, 267, 290, 307, 315, 581 Harvard, 35, 62, 86, 87, 96, 101, 117, 176, 177, 183, 186, 189, 199, 220, 231, 239, 240, 241, 245, 275, 290, 293, 294, 303, 354, 392, 397, 416, 445, 448, 451, 452, 454, 455, 456, 459, 459 n.