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on, slightly. They are all doing well. These are all the casualties in our brigade so far as I can learn. The enemy did not accomplish all this mischief with impunity. The gallant Lieutenant Hall emptied one saddle, and the brave Lieutenant Harris another. Lieutenant Harris also disabled one of the rebels by a blow on his head with a saber, and captured him. There was also a rebel Sergeant-Major taken prisoner. Whether the enemy sustained any further loss or not, I don't know. Our boyLieutenant Harris also disabled one of the rebels by a blow on his head with a saber, and captured him. There was also a rebel Sergeant-Major taken prisoner. Whether the enemy sustained any further loss or not, I don't know. Our boys state that they saw some of our men shot and others knocked upon the head after they surrendered, and three of the men that we buried have marks of having been knocked on the head; two of them had fatal gunshot wounds. The other had the side of his forehead crushed in, apparently by a blow with a clubbed gull; there were no other marks of violence upon his person. The rebels were led by the savage Wheeler, so I am informed by the wounded rebel prisoner we have in charge. I asked him how
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
superior force, posted strongly in the woods, and after much skirmishing returned upon Hill's Point, from which the enemy could not dislodge him. I again take pleasure in acknowledging the valuable services of Lieutenants Cushing, Samson, and Harris, United States Navy. These officers rendered every assistance in their power in crossing the river. Lieutenant Cushing sent a boat, howitzer, and detachment, with the Fourth Rhode Island, under Colonel Dutton. I regret to state that Colonel mainly indebted to the Provost Marshal, Major Smith, of the One Hundred and Twelfth New York, for the good order and cleanliness which has prevailed in the town and camp. The co-operation of the gunboats, under Lieutenants Cushing, Samson and Harris,United States Navy, sent by Admiral Lee, has been very effective, and I take great pleasure in acknowledging the gallant services of their officers and crews. The army gunboats, Smith Briggs. and West End, commanded by Captain Lee and Lieutenan
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. General Rousseau's expedition. (search)
at Hamilton, Ohio, and in an editorial article eulogized Val. as a gifted statesman, orator, and patriotic exile. The Editor further shows the following, looking to the peace party of the North for aid in sustaining the rebellion: It is our desire to see the names of Fernando Wood and C. L. Vallandigham, or some of their co-laborers, placed upon the ticket of that party at the Chicago convention, for President and Vice-President of the United States, supported by such men as Long and Harris; and just in proportion to the support they receive will the North exhibit signs of returning reason and humanity. If they are elected we expect to have peace, independence, and constitutional liberty. Several printers were detailed and sent to the office, and the press was soon put to a use never anticipated by its owner-printing orders and blanks for a Yankee command. The printers also amused themselves by taking out a column of secession stuff from the form of the Vidette, and insert
nfield to the right of the road, while another body was placed immediately down the road and on the edge of the field. Our dismounted men were thrown out on each side of the road. While the cavalry was advanced, the dismounted men, under a most galling fire, broke with a fearful yell, and, simultaneously, the mounted men responded — the Fifth North Carolina--the colonel gallantly leading at the head; The squadron of Captain Galloway dashed at the body on the left in the corn-field, and Captain Harris dashed upon the body down the road. The fierce onset of both these advance squadrons, seconded by a detachment of the First and Second regiments, broke the Yankee columns simultaneously. The scene beggars description. The entire field was wrapped in smoke and dust — the steady charge of the dismounted men drove everything from the flanks. Yelling like demons, they kept pace almost with the horse — helter-skelter, the flying Yankee horse crowd and jam down the road. The troopers goad<
was particularly aggravating The rebels now commenced throwing over everything of value — cotton, furniture, silverware, hose, pump-handles, barrels, &c. The water was thickly dotted with these goods, and Captain Ransom concluded there would be but little left for him, unless he checked the enemy at once. He put on all steam, and in a few minutes was in a position to give her an old-fashioned broadside. The rebel captain knew what he might expect, and stopped his engine. A pillow-case went up to mast-head, and the rebel steamer Young Republic was a prize to the United States gunboat Grand Gulf. Captain Harris, of the former, had designed blowing up his ship. To accomplish this he had fastened down the safety-valve, expecting to take to the boats and get off a short distance before the explosion would take place. The prompt action of Captain Ransom prevented this, though the safety-valve was found closed and a fearful head of steam on. The total number of men on board was forty.
teen miles. The Ninth and Sixth followed over the same general lines. The next day, Sunday, the twenty-second, the march was resumed — Warren crossing the Ta, and striking into the telegraph road, down which the rear of the columns of Longstreet and Ewell had a short time before disappeared. Here he had a skirmish with the enemy's rear guard of cavalry, consisting of Rosser's brigade, which was repulsed. Hancock advancing due westward from Milford, five miles, struck the telegraph road at Harris' store. Sunday's march brought our army forward an additional fourteen miles, and within a few miles of the North Anna. The region between Spottsylvania and the North Anna, through which the advance of Saturday and Sunday carried us, is both fair and fertile. The face of the country is beautifully undulating, nowhere bold,and the river bottoms have many large and fine plantations, all under cultivation. It was virgin ground over which we marched, showing none of those desolating traces
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25-- (search)
teen miles. The Ninth and Sixth followed over the same general lines. The next day, Sunday, the twenty-second, the march was resumed — Warren crossing the Ta, and striking into the telegraph road, down which the rear of the columns of Longstreet and Ewell had a short time before disappeared. Here he had a skirmish with the enemy's rear guard of cavalry, consisting of Rosser's brigade, which was repulsed. Hancock advancing due westward from Milford, five miles, struck the telegraph road at Harris' store. Sunday's march brought our army forward an additional fourteen miles, and within a few miles of the North Anna. The region between Spottsylvania and the North Anna, through which the advance of Saturday and Sunday carried us, is both fair and fertile. The face of the country is beautifully undulating, nowhere bold,and the river bottoms have many large and fine plantations, all under cultivation. It was virgin ground over which we marched, showing none of those desolating traces
e, and she was soon piled upon the sand. About fifteen minutes after striking she blew up, the shock of the explosion seriously straining her hull, and causing her to fill in short order. Her name was Pevensey, formerly called the Kangaroo. She was laden with firearms, saltpetre, dry goods, and various other things, and was first seen by the Newbern off New Inlet. The day before she had been chased by the Quaker City for more than sixteen hours, and left near where she was found by Lieutenant Harris. The Pevensey was a very large boat, and would have been to her captors decidedly the finest prize yet taken off this part of Dixie, being over six hundred tons, and very handsomely fitted out. For the time being most of the crew escaped; but, strange to say, that the second mate of the steamer remained fast asleep in his bunk after the explosion had taken place. If the weather had proved favorable, it is more than probable she would have been got off; but a strong breeze from the so
. Gatlen, George W. Goodwin, Ephraim Stonesifer, Hezekiah Shelling, Henry Taylor, James Young. Company C--Missing--Sergeant J. R. Poffenberger, Privates Martin Glass, Henry R. Haines, George W. Palmer. Company K--Wounded — James Fisher, William Harris, Frederick Lutz, John H. Weldy. Missing — Thomas Brown, Thomas P. Collins, Nicholas Serverns, Gotleib Siedel, G. Hamilton Smith. 149TH regiment Ohio National guard. The medical officer on duty with this regiment, including Dr. Burnison tin Glass Private H Slightly wounded and missing. Wm. S. Bamford Private H Slightly wounded. James Cunningham Private H Wounded in hip. John Cuddy Private H Wounded slightly. Charles J. Brown Captain K Wounded slightly, in arm. William Harris Private K Shot in the leg, leg amputated. Frederick Lutz Private K Wounded through the left breast, mortally. John H. Welch Private K Wounded on shoulder and side. James Fisher Private K Shot through the neck. Joseph Maloney Priva
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Third Regt., Potomac Home brigade, Md. Vols. (search)
poral J. A. Wagner, Privates R. C. Balsell, James D. Keller, R. M. Mitchell, Thomas Smith, U. H. Yingling, Andrew Teakle. Company G--Captured--Corporal Henry Nafe, Privates Rufus P. Burner, G. G. Brane, Garded Luttman. Missing — James Irvin, G. W. Gatlen, George W. Goodwin, Ephraim Stonesifer, Hezekiah Shelling, Henry Taylor, James Young. Company C--Missing--Sergeant J. R. Poffenberger, Privates Martin Glass, Henry R. Haines, George W. Palmer. Company K--Wounded — James Fisher, William Harris, Frederick Lutz, John H. Weldy. Missing — Thomas Brown, Thomas P. Collins, Nicholas Serverns, Gotleib Siedel, G. Hamilton Smith. 149TH regiment Ohio National guard. The medical officer on duty with this regiment, including Dr. Burnison of the Eleventh Maryland, together with the killed and wounded fell into the hands of the enemy. No report has yet been received from the commanding officer. Eleventh Maryland volunteers (Militia). Wounded — John Fade, Company A (leg), Thoma