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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Abigail Harris or search for Abigail Harris in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the Fifth Company held Spanish Fort, Mobile bay, and a detachment of the Washington Artillery were in Fort Gregg—the two last forts held by our two armies. Fort Gregg, a detached work south of Petersburg, was defended by 150 Mississippians, of Harris's brigade, and two guns of the Washington Artillery, under the intrepid McElroy. The Federals, 5,000 strong, under Gibbon, attacked, and were thrice driven back by our messengers of destruction and death. Again and again they charged, until upoon was born on the 2d of February, 1803, in the village of Washington, Mason county, Ky. He was the youngest son of Dr. Johnston, a physician, and one of the early settlers of that town. After the loss of his first wife, Dr. Johnston married Abigail Harris, the daughter of Edward Harris, who was an old citizen and a soldier of the war of the revolution. From this marriage sprang six children—three daughters and three sons—of whom Albert Sidney Johnston, the subject of this address, was the you<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
d crept surely in, And the end was coming fast. It was smoke and roar and powder stench, And weary waiting for death. So the men plied their hopeless war And knew that the end was near. April 2, the lines were broken. By a singular coincidence the Fifth Company held Spanish Fort, Mobile bay, and a detachment of the Washington Artillery were in Fort Gregg—the two last forts held by our two armies. Fort Gregg, a detached work south of Petersburg, was defended by 150 Mississippians, of Harris's brigade, and two guns of the Washington Artillery, under the intrepid McElroy. The Federals, 5,000 strong, under Gibbon, attacked, and were thrice driven back by our messengers of destruction and death. Again and again they charged, until upon this little spot, it was like unto the fire of hell, and amid the crashing rain of leaden missiles, severing soul from body, the brave little garrison was overwhelmed and taken prisoners. Swinton says out of 200 souls in Gregg, but thirty lived to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
na, who are before me to-day, as I said to my own son, when I placed this biography in his hand, and bade him read and study it, that it presents a portraiture of civic virtues and public honor that all may take pattern after. Albert Sidney Johnston was born on the 2d of February, 1803, in the village of Washington, Mason county, Ky. He was the youngest son of Dr. Johnston, a physician, and one of the early settlers of that town. After the loss of his first wife, Dr. Johnston married Abigail Harris, the daughter of Edward Harris, who was an old citizen and a soldier of the war of the revolution. From this marriage sprang six children—three daughters and three sons—of whom Albert Sidney Johnston, the subject of this address, was the youngest son. General Johnston inherited from his father that solid judgment, powers of self-control, and rare equipose of mind which so distinguished him in after life, whether in prosperity or adversity. From his mother, who died early in life, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
n which his last labors were bestowed, should be attended from the studio of the artist to the place of its final deposit by the students of the college of the metropolis of the State, we earnestly present this petition of our societies, and hope that this sacred office may be entrusted to their charge. J. T. E. Thornhill, Charles R. Darby, W. D. Groton, R. H. Pitt, S. S. Woodward—Committee from Mu Sigma Rho Society. William M. Turpin, R. T. Hanks, Hugh C. Smith, C. N. Donaldson, A. M. Harris—Committee from Philologian Society. At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Lee Memorial Association on the 1st of April, 1875, the following resolutions were adopted: Resolved, 1. That Messrs. Dr. J. William Jones and E. V. Valentine be requested by the Lee Memorial Association to make the arrangements necessary for the removal of the Lee monument from the artist's studio to Lexington, Va. Resolved, 2. That the Lee Memorial Association, having heard from Rev. Dr. Jones that
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
me by General Bragg, and on file. McLemore's Cove. To return for a moment to McLemore's Cove, General Bragg had sent General Hindman to attack Thomas in flank and rear, whilst he would move up the mountain in force from Lafayette and attack in front; § the attack in front to commence when the guns of Hindman were heard in the rear. His guns were not heard by us on the mountain, and consequently the golden opportunity of bagging that portion of the enemy, as tritely remarked by ex-Governor Harris of Tennessee (then volunteer aid on General Bragg's staff), was lost to us. For this blunder or failure of General Hindman's he was soon relieved from command. See the charges and specifications preferred by General Bragg against this officer, copies of which are in my possession. Battle of Chickamauga: On the evening of the 18th September General Pegram, of cavalry, having reported the enemy in force at the river (Chickamauga), Walthall's brigade, which was leading the advan