Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for B. F. Harris or search for B. F. Harris in all documents.

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our artillery. Nature could not have made a stronger position, and this they had fortified; and when the rebel Colonel Patten arrived, he stated that he could with his regiment, the Twenty-second, hold it against the whole of Averill's brigade; but, poor fellow, he was wofully mistaken. When the brigade arrived at Hillsborough, a village three miles from the top of the mountain, Keeper's battery was sent to the left, supported by the Fourteenth Pennsylvania; while the Tenth Virginia, Colonel Harris, and the Twenty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Moore, (German regiment,) were sent to the right, to endeavor to turn the rebel position. Next to the Twenty-eighth was the Third Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Thompson; then the Second Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Scott; and the Eighth Virginia, Colonel Oley. These were all old veterans, that had been trained in the valley and Eastern Virginia, under Milroy, Cluseret, and Bohlen. The skirmishers moved off in splendid style, with the supporting line
iments took a most prominent and glorious part. This brigade is composed of the Fifth Wisconsin, commanded by Colonel T. S. Allen; the Sixth Maine, Lieutenant-Colonel B. F. Harris; the Forty-ninth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel T. M. Hulings, and the One Hundred and Nineteenth Pennsylvania, Colonel P. C. Ellmaker-all volunteerort, pierced through the body, and with his brains blown out, lies Lieutenant McKinley, of the same regiment. At the foot of the hill, in the road, lies Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, with a shattered hip — Harris, than whom no better or braver officer lives. Half-way up the ascent lies Major Wheeler, of the Fifth Wisconsin, but justHarris, than whom no better or braver officer lives. Half-way up the ascent lies Major Wheeler, of the Fifth Wisconsin, but just recovered from a previous wound, to be again struck down. At the edge of the parapet, urging on the men, Lieutenant Russell, aid-de-camp and near relative to the General, is smitten from his horse with a dangerous wound — a courageous, high-toned soldier. Close by him falls Clark, Adjutant of the Sixth Maine--rebel-hating, rebe