Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Wiley P. Harris or search for Wiley P. Harris in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

loftier patriotism and inspiration than the keys of the piano. In a memorial to the Confederate Congress, approved August 2, 1861, in reference to buying and holding all cotton and tobacco as a basis of credit, this language occurs: We, the representatives of a united people determined to prosecute the war with all the men and means at our command to a successful termination or a total annihilation of men and money, deem it highly expedient, etc. As early as September 30, 1861, Judge Wiley P. Harris, Mississippi's most distinguished citizen, wrote to President Davis as follows: You would be struck with the aspect which our State now presents. Except in the principal towns the country appears to be deserted. There are not more men left than the demands of society and the police of a slaveholding country actually require. The State has put in the field and in camp about 25,000 men. This exceeds her proportion. If invaded, she could send to battle 10,000 or 15,000 more, but she