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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trials. (search)
sor Briggs acquitted after a trial of nineteen days......Dec. 30, 1892 John Y. McKane, Gravesend, L. I., for election frauds; convicted and sentenced to Sing Sing for six years......Feb. 19, 1894 Miss Madeline V. Pollard, for breach of promise, against Representative W. C. P. Breckinridge, of Kentucky; damages, $50,000; trial begun March 8, 1894, at Washington, D. C.; verdict of $15,000 for Miss Pollard, Saturday......April 14, 1894 Patrick Eugene Prendergast, for the murder of Carter Harrison, mayor of Chicago, Oct. 28, 1893; plea of defence, insanity; jury find him sane and he is hanged......July 13, 1894 Eugene V. Debs, president American Railroad Union, charged with conspiracy in directing great strike on the Western railroads, and acquitted......1894 [He was sentenced to six months imprisonment for contempt of court in violating its injunction in 1895.] William R. Laidlaw, Jr., v. Russell Sage, for personal injuries at time of bomb explosion in the latter's offi
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
of this company sought and obtained the pardon of their sins. Rev. Dr. J. C. Granberry, then chaplain of the Eleventh Virginia Regiment, thus speaks of Major Carter Harrison, a brother of Captain Dabney Carr Harrison (of whom an extended sketch is given in a previous chapter): I shall never cease to remember with admiration one of the earliest victims of this war, Major Carter Harrison, of the Eleventh Virginia. He was an earnest servant of Christ; modest, firm, unostentatious, zealous. He seized at once the hearts of the regiment by his many virtues, by his courtesy to all and his kind visits to the sick, to whom he bore a word not only of sympathy, Lieutenant William Fauntleroy Cocke, of Cumberland county, Virginia, has been thus touchingly described by the facile pen of Mrs. Margaret J. Preston: Captain Carter Harrison, in a letter to his brother, thus speaks of him: My intimate acquaintance with your noble brother, William, dates from the commencement of the war,
s of pious officers and men had a powerful influence for good on the hearts of careless and irreligious persons. I have known many noble specimens of the Christian soldier, said Rev. Dr. John C. Granbery, then chaplain of the 11th Virginia regiment, afterwards Superintendent of Methodist missionaries in Gen. Lee's army, whom the soldiers will never forget on account of his zeal and faithfulness; I shall never cease to remember with admiration one of the earliest victims of this war, Major Carter Harrison, of the 11th Virginia. He was an earnest servant of Christ; modest, firm, unostentatious, zealous. He seized at once the hearts of the regiment by his many virtues, by his courtesy to all and his kind visits to the sick, to whom he bore a word not only of sympathy, but also of pious exhortation. On the lovely morning of July 18th, as we awaited the advance of the enemy and the opening of our first battle, our conversation was on sacred things. In a few hours he was mortally woun
e First Regiment, who fell back. A few volleys of musketry were exchanged; the artillery on both sides, which had ceased firing, again opened upon each other; an almost incessant shower of grape from our side soon silenced the enemy's battery, and — the battle was won! Our whole regiment, officers and men, fought with astonishing bravery, and stood their ground firmly. There was but little opportunity to individualize others of our brigade who were engaged, but the lamented Maj. Carter Harrison, of the Eleventh Regiment, and Major Munford, with others, were in the thickest of the fire. When Col. Moore was wounded, the command devolved on Lieut. Col. Fry, who from sickness and fatiguing duties in the most exposed points, towards the close of the battle sank down and had to be carried from the field, and continued sick for several days.--The command then devolved on Major Skinner, who exhibited the greatest coolness and activity. Adjutant Mitchell displayed in battle, as eve