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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 11 1 Browse Search
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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 15: (search)
Woodford, General Fuller, General Julius White, Reverend G. C. Trusdell, General R. J. Oglesby, Governor Cullom, John C. Barker, Colonel E. B. Sherman, Captain J. S. Curtiss, Colonel Mann, Emery A. Storrs, E. A. Filkins, Judge R. S. Tuthill, Mayor Harrison, Brigadier-General Pavey, Captain M. E. Ewing, J. H. Russell, and others. The old flag of the 21st Illinois Volunteers, Grant's original regiment, was brought out and three ringing cheers given. To hold aloft this tattered emblem during the, General W. Q. Gresham, General Logan, General Sherman, General Grant, General Sheridan, Rear-Admiral Stevens, Judge A. Taft, General Pope, General Crook, General Robinson, Governor Smith, Governor Gear, Hon. E. B. Washburne, Judge Howe, and Mayor Harrison, which brought Sherman in the middle with Grant and Sheridan on his right, Logan and Gresham on his left. General Sherman was the toast-master, a position he filled admirably. The toasts, prepared mainly by Hon. Richard S. Tuthill of Chi
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
aul, Minnesota, and my daughter had to leave me absolutely alone to accompany her husband to his new post. During President Harrison's administration, on the retirement of Corporal Tanner as commissioner of pensions, without my knowledge I was strongly recommended as his successor. President Harrison sent for me and said it would give him great pleasure to appoint me commissioner of pensions if I desired the position. I realized the grave responsibilities attached to it and felt unequal to asuming them. I none the less appreciated the honor which had been done me by the recommendations of my friends and President Harrison's willingness to comply with their request. January 19, 1895, I again sailed for Europe, this time on the Kaise agreeable passengers, some of them distinguished people, among them Colonel Logan, of the English Artillery, and Sir Frederick Harrison, the writer. On the morning after our arrival in Alexandria, which might be called the City of Obelisks, we s
the evidence connected with the destruction by fire of the confederate States Steamer Virginia, on the morning of May eleventh, 1862, near Craney Island, respectfully report that it was effected by the order and under the supervision of Flag-Officer Tatnall, after her draft had been reduced to twenty feet six inches, and on the representations of the pilots that in consequence of recent prevalent westerly winds, she could not be taken with a draft of eighteen feet as high as Westover, near Harrison's Bar, in James River, (whither he designed to take her,) which they previously stated they could do. 1. The destruction of the Virginia was, in the opinion of the court, unnecessary at the time and place it was effected. 2. It being clearly in evidence that Norfolk being evacuated, and Flag-Officer Tatnall having been instructed to prevent the enemy from ascending James River, the Virginia, with very little more, if any, lessening of draft, after lightening her to twenty feet six inc
ng after the occurrence, regiments of infantry were thrown along both sides of the railroad to act as a guard, while several companies of cavalry were despatched on scouting expeditions through the woods and surrounding country. Every effort was made by our men, who were enraged beyond measure, to capture the daring and desperate rebels. They have succeeded in capturing six of the rebels, among whom are Capt. Garlick, whose father lives at the landing where the rebels crossed the river; Dr. Harrison, a rampant secesh, who lives near this place, and whose property has been constantly guarded by Union soldiers since this place fell into our hands. It is said that he has been in constant communication with the rebels since their departure from Yorktown, and it is positively asserted that Gen. Stuart, who is supposed to have led this marauding band, and the rebel Lee, who formerly lived here, have, on more than one occasion, been guests at his house. There is no disguising the fact tha
ality and topographical features of the enemy's selected place of refuge, will be a matter of interest. Berkeley, now the residence of Dr. Starke, lies on the north side of James River, five miles below City Point, and by the course of the river sixty-five miles, but by the Charles City road not more than twenty-five miles from Richmond. The building, an old-fashioned, brick edifice, stands upon an eminence a few hundred yards from the river, in a grove of poplars and other trees. President Harrison was born here in 1773: The Westover plantation, long the seat of the distinguished family of Byrds, and at present owned by Mr. John Selden, adjoins Berkeley on the east, the dwelling-houses being some two miles apart. Charles City Court-House is between eight and ten miles east of the latter place. It is not to be supposed the enemy selected these plantations as the scene of his last great stand without good reasons. The first and most apparent of these is, that the Westover lan
nd what connection must be kept up with Burnside. It has been my purpose to conform my operations to your plans, yet I was not informed when McClellan evacuated Harrison's so that I might know what to expect in that direction; and when I say these things, in no complaining spirit, I think you know well that I am anxious to do eveMorrow, who became engaged in a difficulty through his observing that he wished every one in the Maryland regiment to be killed. He was committed to jail. Frederick Harrison, of Baltimore county, arrested by United States Deputy Marshal Williams, on a charge of interfering with the officers in the discharge of their duties. Jamfficers on charges of acting disorderly or fighting in the street. Young, Kennedy and Drury were discharged by Justice Hiss and the others released on security, Harrison for a hearing this morning. Caleb Sawyer was arrested and fined five dollars for discharging a pistol at John Isaacs. This affair occurred on Calvert street, S
, I can't correct it. The troops arriving here come in fragments. Am I to assign them to brigades and corps? I would suppose not, as several of the new regiments coming have been assigned to army corps directly from your office. In case I commence offensive operations I must know what forces I am to take and what you wish left, and what connection must be kept up with Burnside. It has been my purpose to conform my operations to your plans, yet I was not informed when McClellan evacuated Harrison's so that I might know what to expect in that direction; and when I say these things, in no complaining spirit, I think you know well that I am anxious to do every thing to advance your plans of campaign. I understood that this army was to maintain the line of the Rappahannock until all the forces from the Peninsula had united behind that river. I have done so. I understood distinctly that I was not to hazard any thing except for this purpose, as delay was what was wanted. The enemy th
arties were arrested by the police and taken to the Middle District Station: Robert Morrow, who became engaged in a difficulty through his observing that he wished every one in the Maryland regiment to be killed. He was committed to jail. Frederick Harrison, of Baltimore county, arrested by United States Deputy Marshal Williams, on a charge of interfering with the officers in the discharge of their duties. James Knox and Samuel Drury, Thomas Rodgers, Wensel Kennedy and John Young, were arrested by other officers on charges of acting disorderly or fighting in the street. Young, Kennedy and Drury were discharged by Justice Hiss and the others released on security, Harrison for a hearing this morning. Caleb Sawyer was arrested and fined five dollars for discharging a pistol at John Isaacs. This affair occurred on Calvert street, Sawyer being pointed out as a rebel while passing near the corner of Baltimore street, and on his running away was pursued by an excited crowd, at the forem
the notorious Col, Coleman, who was said to be encamped at a place known as the Mountain Store, situated about twenty-five miles from here. When within five miles of the store, the advance-guard of the detachment came suddenly upon a band of sixty of Coleman's men, led by himself. We killed three of the rebels, wounded several, took fifteen prisoners, three horses, and six guns. From the prisoners we learned that Coleman had moved his camp to the right-hand fork of the Big Piney, near a Mr. Harrison's, and that when we met him, he was on his way to camp. On the morning of the twenty-sixth, we moved to attack the enemy's camp. After we had marched about two and a half miles, our advance met the enemy's pickets and drove them in. Hearing heavy and continuous firing, Capt. Bradway sent forward Capt. Call, with twenty men of his company, to support the advance, and find the location of the rebel encampment. In a short time, he sent word to Captain Bradway that he had met a large bo