Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for G. P. Harrison or search for G. P. Harrison in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
t Pemberton, and after gaining possession of the Stono, moved from James' island to the mainland. Nevertheless the Confederate line put on a bold front and Colonel Harrison, with his Georgians, advanced and drove back the Federal pickets to their original line. For several days afterward artillery firing continued along the line detachments from the First and Second artillery, Company B, siege train; First cavalry, First infantry (regulars), Kirk's and Peeples' squadrons of cavalry and Harrison's and Bonaud's Georgians, the South Carolina officers commanding being Major Manigault, Major Blanding, Capts. R. P. Smith, Dickson, Warley, Rivers, Witherspoon,d service, and Colonels Black, Frederick and Rhett were faithful and efficient in their duties commanding on the east and west and in reserve. On the 8th Colonel Harrison, with his brigade, was sent to the assistance of Gen. B. H. Robertson, commanding on John's island. The latter had repulsed several assaults, Major Jenkins
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
nia, arrived in this month, and on the 31st, General Hardee's army was organized as follows: McLaws' division, composed of Conner's brigade, Colonel Kennedy; the Georgia brigade (reserves) of Col. John C. Fiser; the Georgia brigade of Col. G. P. Harrison, including a detachment of the First South Carolina cavalry; Col. W. M. Hardy's North Carolina brigade; another brigade of Georgia reserves, and six batteries of artillery. Taliaferro's division, composed of Brig.-Gen. Stephen Elliott'ner, J. R. Mathewes, C. E. Kanapaux, G. H. Walter; Stono scouts, Capt. J. B. L. Walpole; Wilkins' cavalry company reserves. Wheeler's cavalry corps included the brigades of Anderson, Hagan and Crews, in Allen's division; of Dibrell, Ashby and Harrison, in Humes' division; and of Ferguson, Lewis and Hannon, in Iverson's division. Brig.-Gen. J. H. Trapier's brigade, detached, was composed of Ward's battalion reserves, Capt. L. A. Grice; Capt. J. J. Steele's cavalry company, and the artillery
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
iment of infantry (afterward known as the Eleventh regiment), as Company 1. He served with this company until the reorganization of the army in the spring of 1862, at which time he was made senior captain of the regiment. After the death of Major Harrison, at the battle of Pocotaligo, he was promoted to fill the vacancy, and on the resignation of Colonel Ellis, which occurred in January or February, 1863, he was made lieutenant-colonel of the regiment. He served with the regiment from Savannaiege of Petersburg, and all the battles around Richmond. In October, 1864, he was put on the retired list and sent to Florence, S. C., and was appointed assistant adjutant and inspector-general of the prison post at that place, serving on Gen. G. P. Harrison's staff. He remained in Florence until Sherman's raid occasioned a removal of the prisons to Salisbury, N. C., and he was then sent to Cheraw, as post quartermaster. He remained there until Sherman passed through on his march of destruc