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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thomson, Charles 1729-1824 (search)
you are very expert at that business. Thomson complied, and he served in that capacity almost fifteen years. He was a thorough patriot, and held the respect and confidence of all his associates. He had married, at the age of forty-five, Hannah Harrison, aunt of President Harrison. Thomson was an excellent classical scholar, and made a translation of the Old and New Testaments. He had gathered much material for a history of the Revolution, but destroyed it. He died in Lower Merion, Pa., Ay expert at that business. Thomson complied, and he served in that capacity almost fifteen years. He was a thorough patriot, and held the respect and confidence of all his associates. He had married, at the age of forty-five, Hannah Harrison, aunt of President Harrison. Thomson was an excellent classical scholar, and made a translation of the Old and New Testaments. He had gathered much material for a history of the Revolution, but destroyed it. He died in Lower Merion, Pa., Aug. 16, 1824.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thurman, Allen Granbery 1813-1895 (search)
Thurman, Allen Granbery 1813-1895 Statesman; born in Lynchburg, Va., Nov. 13, 1813; practised law in Chillicothe, O., and became eminent at the bar; was a life-long Democrat. In 1845-47 he represented Ohio in the national House of Representatives, and in 1851-55 was a judge of the State Supreme Court. In 1867 he was the candidate for governor in opposition to Rutherford B. Hayes, and the campaign was close and exciting, though Hayes won. During two terms, 1869 to 1881, Thurman was a member of the United States Senate, where he served on the judiciary committee and on the electoral commission of 1877, and was a leader of the party and an authority on constitutional questions. He had been a candidate for the Presidential nomination, and in 1888 he accepted the second place on the ticket with Grover Cleveland. In the election Cleveland and Thurman were defeated by Harrison and Morton. Senator Thurman died in Columbus, O., Dec. 12, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tippecanoe, battle of (search)
ordered to repair to Vincennes to be placed under Harrison's command, and the latter was authorized, should tdians begin hostilities, to call out the militia. Harrison agreed with the people of Vincennes that decisive , the Prophet, was stirring up the Indians to war. Harrison, with Boyd's regiment, 300 strong, and 500 militiathe Prophet had become aware of their approach. Harrison arranged his camp in the form of an irregular paraons, baggage, officers' tents, etc. Having supped, Harrison gave instructions to the several officers, and verthe prairie grass, and with horrid yells fell upon Harrison's camp. The whole camp was soon awakened, and theed men, leaving forty of their dead on the field. Harrison's loss was upward of sixty killed, and twice as mahat was valuable behind. The town was burned, and Harrison deemed it prudent to make a speedy retreat, encumbback to Vincennes. This battle of Tippecanoe gave Harrison a decided military reputation. The battleground i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Todd, Charles Scott -1871 (search)
Todd, Charles Scott -1871 Military officer; born near Danville, Ky., Jan. 22, 1791; graduated at William and Mary College in 1809; was a subaltern and judge-advocate of Winchester's division of Kentucky volunteers in 1812; made captain of infantry in May, 1813; and was aide to General Harrison in the battle of the Thames (q. v.). In March, 1815, he was made inspector-general, with the rank of colonel; and in 1817 was secretary of State of Kentucky. In 1820 he was confidential agent to Colombia, and in 1841-45 was United States minister to Russia. He died in Baton Rouge, La., May 17, 1871.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tracy, Benjamin Franklin 1830- (search)
Tracy, Benjamin Franklin 1830- Lawyer; born in Oswego, N. Y., April 26, 1830; became an influential Republican politician, and a prominent lawyer in New York raised two regiments, for the Civil War; commissioned colonel, of the 109th New York Volunteers; was severely wounded at the battle of the Wilderness; brevetted brigadier-general in 1865; received a congressional medal of honor for gallantry in battle. After the war he served as United States district attorney and associate judge of the court of appeals; and was Secretary of the Navy in President Harrison's cabinet, 1889-93. At the close of his term he returned to the practice of law; was president of the commission which drafted the charter for the Greater New York; and was an unsuccessful candidate for first mayor under this charter.