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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 12, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), His son, Thomas Dekay 1820-1878 (search)
His son, Thomas Dekay 1820-1878 Engineer, born in Vernon, N. J., Dec. 6, 1820, became a partner with his father and his brother, William Lewis. In 1843, with Andrew M. Eastwick, and Joseph Harrison, he went to Russia in the place of his father, who had been invited to St. Petersburg by the Russian government, and executed a contract to construct the rollingstock of the railroad between St. Petersburg and Moscow, for $3,000,000. Later other contracts were concluded which proved very lucrative. He invented with his father and brother a system of steam navigation known as the cigar-ship, and a tubular arrangement by which young trout could be easily fed. He died in Newport, R. I., June 11, 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Winchester, James 1752- (search)
Winchester, James 1752- Military officer; born in White Level, Md., Feb. 6, 1752; was appointed a lieutenant in the 3d Maryland Regiment in May, 1776; was made a prisoner by the British and exchanged in 1780. On March 27, 1812, he was commissioned a brigadier-general and assigned to duty in the Army of the Northwest, under Harrison. He was made prisoner by General Proctor at Frenchtown, Jan. 22, 1813, and, with other officers, was sent to Quebec. At Beauport, near that city, they were kept in confinement more than a year, and were exchanged in the spring of 1814. General Winchester resigned his commission in March, 1815. He died near Gallatin, Tenn., July 27, 1826.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Windom, William 1827- (search)
Windom, William 1827- Financier; born in Belmont county, O., May 10, 1827; studied law, settled in Minnesota, and was in Congress in 1859-69, and the United States Senate in 1870-81. He attained prominence on the Republican side, especially in financial matters. Three times, in 1880, 1884, and 1888, his name was presented to Republican national conventions for the Presidential nomination. Senator Windom was a member of President Garfield's cabinet, holding the treasury portfolio. Retiring after Garfield's death, he was chosen again to the Senate, where he remained until 1883. With the return of the Republicans under President Harrison in 1889, Windom was called to take his former cabinet office. He was in the middle of his term when, on Jan. 29, 1891, he was an invited guest at the annual banquet of the board of trade in New York; at this dinner the Secretary dropped dead just after finishing an impressive address on his favorite topic—financ
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ors had been taken to Port Royal or sent north for repairs, and the Ironsides, much damaged, was being repaired at her moorings on the blockading line outside the bar. There is no report at hand of the casualties in the fleet. In the forts and batteries the casualties were very few. At Fort Sumter five men were wounded by splinters from a traverse. Their names are not reported. At Fort Moultrie the flagstaff was shot away, and falling, mortally wounded Private Lusty, Company F. Private Joseph Harrison, Company G, lost a finger, but after having his wound dressed, returned to his gun. Both these gallant men were of Colonel Butler's regiment. At Battery Wagner there were 8 casualties, 3 killed and 5 wounded, by the explosion of an ammunition chest. Sergt. G. W. Langley and Privates Amos Fitzgerald and Jerry Dyer were killed, and Lieut. G. E. Steedman, Corp. Matthew Martin and Privates Samuel Red, Marion Quillan and Thomas Prince were wounded. Total casualties, 4 killed and 11 wo
nd officers: Commander-in-Chief.--Brigadier General John B. Floyd. 1st Regiment.--Colonel. Henry Heth: Lieut. Col. B. E. Ficklin; Major, G. C. Wharton; Adjutant, W. M. Thomas. And Regiment.--Colonel, A. W. Reynolds; Lieut. Col. not yet appointed: Major, F. W. Finney; Adjutant. John L. Cowardin. 3rd Regiment.--Field officers not yet appointed. The following companies are now in the camp near Wytheville. name of COMPANIESCOUNTYname of Floyd GuardsVucewellJoseph HarrisonB. W. Willions Hugh Higalobaham and Wm. M. Thomas Mc Alry Rough & Ready.Wythe.John Rechan Jas. Bheas Chas.Raimyardease and R. S. Grayson Red's GraysonAlexander Davis.L. H. Hryant.S. P. Dicxinian and T. M. Cov. Wythe Minute-Men Wythe.Ko. H. Gleaves. A.C. Burnes.Wm. C. Sanders and Wm. O. Moure. Carroll Rough & Roeds Rides.CarrollWm. Lundy J. R. SumderP. Rearrar and H. H. Geamer Bland Sharp ShuntersBlandA. J. GravsonG. WolfordL Newberry and McAtlan West Augusta SildeTazewellWm. H. h
The Daily Dispatch: December 12, 1862., [Electronic resource], Proclamation of the Governor, of Texas. (search)
Murder. --Thos. L. Ross, C. S. Marshal for Georgia, was shot dead at Marietta, in that State, on the 6th inst., by Joseph Harrison, a gambler. The deceased was attempting to make peace in a fight in which Harrison was engaged. Murder. --Thos. L. Ross, C. S. Marshal for Georgia, was shot dead at Marietta, in that State, on the 6th inst., by Joseph Harrison, a gambler. The deceased was attempting to make peace in a fight in which Harrison was engaged.