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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 43 11 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 20 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 6 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for George P. Harrison or search for George P. Harrison in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
gulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in Gen. George T. Ander-son's brigade, and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the rgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
rchase, with funds from the State treasury, the necessary supply, which was done at a cost of $101,521.43. The governor stated that during August and September no invasion was feared, but as the colder season came on apprehension was felt. He visited the coast and inspected the fortifications, and deciding that the measures of protection taken by authority of the Confederate States were insufficient, determined to call out State troops. In the early part of September he appointed George P. Harrison a brigadier-general, and ordered him to organize a brigade and arm it as far as means permitted with regular rifles, and the balance with good country rifles and shotguns, and to throw the men into camp of instruction near the coast. This brigade was rapidly formed and put in good condition, and F. W. Capers was then commissioned brigadier-general and assigned to the same duty. Subsequently a third brigade was formed by Brig-Gen. W. H. T. Walker. During this period of active milit
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
rength being at Hilton Head. This disposition made it necessary for the Georgia troops to occasionally skirmish between Savannah and Port Royal. Notable among these encounters was one October 22d at Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie, in which Col. G. P. Harrison was in command of the troops sent from Georgia. This was a considerable affair and a decisive victory for the Confederates. Brig.-Gen. Hugh W. Mercer had succeeded to the command of the district of Georgia upon the transfer of General d in General Mercer's command, in the district of Georgia: Eighth battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Reid; Tenth battalion, Major Rylander; Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. C. C. Wilson; Thirtieth regiment. Col. D. J. Bailey; Thirty-second regiment, Col. G. P. Harrison; Fortyenth regiment, Col. G. W. M. Williams; Fiftieth regiment, Col. W. R. Manning; Fifty-fourth regiment, Col. C. H. Way; Fifty-ninth, regiment, Col. Jack Brown; Georgia Guards, Major Screven; DeKalb Rifles, Captain Hartridge; Second bat
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
utenant-colonel, J. H. Lowe, major, William M. Head, adjutant. Captain Forrester (killed) was succeeded by C. L. Shorter; Sanders by Archer Griffith; Crowder by Thomas B. Settle; Redding, by W. H. Harrison; Fletcher by S. W. Thornton. The Thirty-first participated in all the campaigns of the army of Northern Virginia except that of First Manassas, bearing a conspicuously active part. At the organization of the Thirty-second regiment Georgia volunteers the field officers were: Col. George P. Harrison, Jr., Lieut.-Col. W. H. Pruden, Maj. E. H. Bacon, Jr., Adjt. G. M. Blount; Capts. (A) W. Y. Holland, (B) J. B. McDowell, (C) S. J. Heath, (D) R. K. Hines, (E) S. A. H. Jones, (F) C. A. Willis, (G) J. A. Phillips, (H) S. D. Mobley, (I) J. F. Lewis, (K) F. G. Godbee. This regiment served for most of the war in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, being engaged in much of the fierce fighting in the vicinity of Charleston in 1863, notably in the defense of Battery Wagne
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
s! the hour is at hand to prove your devotion to your country's cause. Let all able-bodied men, from the seaboard to the mountains, rush to arms. Be not exacting in the choice of weapons; pikes and scythes will do for exterminating your enemies, spades and shovels for protecting your friends. The organization of Confederate forces in the district of Georgia, under Gen. H. W. Mercer, was reported in March as follows: Brigade of Gen. W. H. Taliaferro—Thirty-second regiment, Col. George P. Harrison; Forty-seventh regiment, Col. G. W. M. Williams; Fourth Louisiana battalion, Col. J. McEnery. Brigade of Gen. W. H. T. Walker—Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. C. C. Wilson; Twenty-ninth regiment, Col. William J. Young; Thirtieth regiment, Col. Thomas W. Mangham. Savannah river batteries and other defenses—First of Georgia, Col. C. H. Olmstead; Fifty-fourth regiment, Col. Charlton H. Way; Sixty-third regiment, Col. G. A. Gordon; First battalion sharpshooters, Capt. A. Shaaff; battal<
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
. Among those especially commended for gallantry were Captains Buckner and Dixon of the Sixty-third Georgia and Corporal Conneway of the Twenty-second Georgia battalion. General Taliaferro also commended the bravery and zeal of the Georgians under Col. C. H. Olmstead, Lieut.-Col. H. D. Capers, Maj. G. M. Hanvey and Maj. W. S. Basinger, which, together with several South Carolina commands, had formed the garrison during the first part of the week. During a large part of August, Col. George P. Harrison, of the Thirty-second Georgia, commanded Battery Wagner, having in garrison, besides his own regiment, the Twelfth Georgia battalion. Other Georgia commands engaged at Charleston were the Sixth, Nineteenth, Twenty-third, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth, Colquitt's brigade; the Thirty-second and Fifty-fourth regiments, and Anderson's brigade, which arrived in September, including the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Eleventh and Fifty-ninth. Capt. J. R. Haines, commanding the Twenty-eighth, w
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
Bonaud's battalion and Guerard's battery, was commanded by Col. George P. Harrison, Thirty-second Georgia. The battle was brought on near eorgia, promptly supported in succession by Colquitt's brigade and Harrison's. General Colquitt commanded the line of battle, with Colonel HarColonel Harrison in charge of the left. The battle began at 3 o'clock and continued until dark. From the first the Georgians pushed back the enemy, anfederate fire. Colquitt's brigade lost 43 killed and 441 wounded; Harrison's, 50 killed and 406 wounded; which, with a few missing, made a toove them in confusion and panic to seek safety in flight. Col. George P. Harrison, who commanded on the left, displayed skill, coolness and nd Sterling Turner, volunteer aides, were also commended.] Colonel Harrison reported that a detachment of the Thirty-second regiment, Complery battalion, Forty-seventh infantry, Chatham artillery. Col. George P. Harrison was in command at Florence, where the Fifth regiment, Col.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
lroad from Macon east to Augusta, were well under way. Nearly 10,000 cavalry were in these two formidable columns, but the genius of Wheeler and Jackson was equal to the emergency. McCook crossed the Chattahoochee near Campbellton, pushing back Harrison's cavalry brigade, and rode rapidly to Lovejoy's Station south of Jonesboro, destroying mules, wagons, live stock and provisions as he went, and, reaching the railroad, destroyed a portion of the track and some rolling stock. Ross' brigade, called from the Lickskillet road during the fight of the 28th, made a hot pursuit, and with Harrison attacked McCook near Lovejoy's. McCook then started back toward Newnan, leaving 20 dead and wounded and 50 prisoners on Ross hands, and taking 300 Confederate prisoners. Wheeler, reaching Jonesboro with Ashby's brigade, pushed on all night of the 29th, and with 400 men attacked the Federal rear guard in the small hours of the 30th at Line creek, where the bridge had been destroyed. After a stubbo
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
y Mayor R. D. Arnold, understanding that further resistance was useless, unanimously adopted resolutions favoring submission to the United States authority, and asking the governor to call a convention of the people for the purpose of an expression of opinion as to whether the war should be continued. In the latter part of January, the main body of Sherman's army crossed into South Carolina. The return of Confederate forces in South Carolina, January 2, 1865, shows in McLaws' division: Harrison's brigade, 1,612 men; Cumming's brigade, 505. Col. John B. Cumming was commanding Georgia reserves at Hardeeville. Maj.-Gen. Howell Cobb continued in command of Georgia reserves with headquarters at Macon. On January 23d, Governor Brown notified President Davis that he had ordered out the reserve militia over fifty years of age, who were at home, and the whole patrol force of the State, to arrest and send forward deserters and stragglers. Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill was put in command of the
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
R. Ballenger; Twenty-seventh, Lieut.-Col. Hezekiah Bussey; Twenty-eighth, Capt. George W. Warthen. In Gist's brigade, Col. William G. Foster-Forty-sixth Georgia, Capt. Abe Miles; Sixty-fifth regiment and Second and Eighth battalions, consolidated, Lieut.-Col. Zachariah L. Watters. In Brig.-Gen. Stephen Elliott's brigade, Patton Anderson's division, Stewart's corps—Twenty-second battalion artillery, Maj. Mark J. McMullan; Twenty-seventh battalion, Maj. Alfred L. Hartridge. Col. George P. Harrison's brigade, Walthall's division, Stewart's corps—First regulars, Col. Richard A. Wayne; Fifth regiment, Col. Charles P. Daniel; Fifth reserves, Maj. C. E. McGregor; Thirty-second regiment, Lieut.-Col. E. H. Bacon, Jr.; Forty-seventh regiment and Bonaud's battalion. Artillery, Stewart's corps—Batteries of Capts. Ruel W. Anderson, John W. Brooks and John F. Wheaton. Brig.-Gen. Robert J. Henderson's brigade, Stevenson's division, S. D. Lee's corps—First Georgia Confederate battal
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