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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 34 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for N. B. Harrison or search for N. B. Harrison in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
sels in the van, where they could immediately crush any naval force that might appear against them. This plan was a better one than that afterward adopted; but he was induced to change the order of his column by the senior commanders of the fleet, who represented to him that it was unwise for the commander-in-chief to take the brunt of the battle. They finally obtained his reluctant consent to an arrangement by which Captain Bailey was to lead in the gun-boat Cayuga, commanded by Lieutenant N. B. Harrison,--a good selection, as it after-ward proved, for these officers were gallant and competent men, well qualified for the position. Captain Bailey had volunteered for the service, and left nothing undone to overcome Farragut's reluctance to give up what was then considered the post of danger, though it turned out to be less hazardous than the places in the rear. The mortar-flotilla steamers under my command were directed to move up before the fleet weighed anchor, and to be ready
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
lk Packet   1 1       1 Arletta 1   1       1 Total 2 24 26 37 147 184 210 first-class screw sloops: Flag-ship Hartford, Commander Richard Wainwright; Brooklyn, Captain Thomas T. Craven; Richmond, Commander James Alden; Pensacola, Captain Henry W. Morris. Side-wheel steamer: Mississippi, Commander Melancton Smith. Second-class screw sloops: Oneida, Commander S. Phillips Lee; Varuna, Commander Charles S. Boggs; Iroquois, Commander John De Camp. Screw gun-boats: Cayuga, Lieutenant N. B. Harrison; Itasca, Lieutenant C. H. B. Caldwell; Katahdin, Lieutenant George H. Preble; Kennebec, Lieutenant John H. Russell; Kineo, Lieutenant George M. Ransom; Pinola, Lieutenant Pierce Crosby; Sciota, Lieutenant Edward Donaldson; Winona, Lieutenant Edward T. Nichols; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith. Sailing sloop (stationed with mortar division): Portsmouth, Commander Samuel Swartwout. mortar division: Commander David D. Porter. Flag-ship : Harriet Lane, Lieutenant J . M. Wainwr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Farragut below New Orleans. (search)
escued from much discomfort and trouble, suddenly jumped to my cot, saying, The preparations are made, lose no time, out of the port by the line there ready for you, and, handing a paper inclosing several gold pieces, was off as suddenly as he came. I watched my opportunity and returned his money to him rolled up in a tobacco wrapper, saying in as few words as possible why I would not betray the confidence placed in me. When General Butler came on board the Cayuga he asked of Lieutenant-Commanding Harrison, pointing with his thumb over his shoulder at me as he walked aft, Where did you catch him? Loud enough for Butler to hear I replied, Where you were not on hand, or your army either. I was to have been paroled, but the burning of my vessel and the reported killing of the steward and reported burning of my wounded, changed my destination to Fort Warren, where, although I was denied the freedom enjoyed by the other prisoners, I was treated with much consideration by Colonel Jus
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
ent from White House on the 18th were at hand in the James. after consultation with Commodore Rodgers, I decided that Harrison's Landing was a better position for the resting-place of the Army, because the channel passed so close to City point as Malvern. It was, however, necessary to accept battle where we were, in order to give ample time for the trains to reach Harrison's, as well as to give the enemy a blow that would check his farther pursuit. accordingly, the Army was carefully post battle was a complete victory on our part, it was necessary, for the reasons already given, to continue the movement to Harrison's, whither the trains had been pushed during the night of the 30th of June and the day of the 1st of July. Immediately mplete was the enemy's discomfiture, and so excellent the conduct of the rear-guard, that the last of the trains reached Harrison's after dark on the 3d, without loss and unmolested by the enemy. this movement was now successfully accomplished, an
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
eems that the 5th New Hampshire halted before the charge which General Sumner had put in motion reached me. I was shot in the face with a minie-ball at the time the enemy broke through the gap in the center. There we had a hand-to-hand encounter, which determined the day in our favor. At nightfall I relieved the first line, its ammunition being exhausted, with the 71st Pennsylvania, the 15th and 20th Massachusetts, and the 82d New York. My report of the Seven Days fighting was made at Harrison's Bar in hot July. I was prostrated with my wound, malaria, and twenty-eight days of constant strain, and was unable to write or to collect my thoughts. The battle at Glendale on the 30th of June, the next day after that of Savage's Station, was saved by my brigade, which kept the enemy from piercing the center of the Army of the Potomac; but, like the instance above, history has given the credit to General Misunderstanding, who, in history, fights most battles. Parts of Hazzard's, P
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
m, 23 == 618. Artillery: A, 5th U. S., Lieut. Charles P. Muhlenberg. Loss: Antietam, w, 3. Kanawha division, Brig.-Gen. Jacob D. Cox, Col. Eliakim P. Scammon. First Brigade, Col. Eliakim P. Scammon, Col. Hugh Ewing: 12th Ohio, Col. Carr B. White; 23d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Rutherford B. Hayes (w), Maj. James M. Comly; 30th Ohio, Col. Hugh Ewing, Lieut.-Col. Theodore Jones (c), Maj. George H. Hildt; 1st Ohio Battery, Capt. James R. McMullin; Gilmore's Co., W. Va. Cav., Lieut. James Abraham; Harrison's Co., W. Va. Cav., Lieut. Dennis Delaney. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 63; w, 201; m, 8 == 272. Antietam, k, 28; w, 134; inn, 20 == 182. Second Brigade, Col. Augustus Moor (c), Col. George Crook: 11th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Augustus H. Coleman (k), Maj. Lyman J. Jackson; 28th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Gottfried Becker; 36th Ohio, Col. George Crook, Lieut.-Col. Melvin Clarke (k), Maj. E. B. Andrews; Chicago (111). Dragoons, Capt. Frederick Schambeck; Ky. Battery, Capt. Seth J. Simmonds. Brigade l