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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 48 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 42 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 7 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Harrison or search for Thomas Harrison in all documents.

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against four times their number, who had the advantage of position and long-range guns, at every point, inflicting terrible havoc upon the enemy. During one of these foot charges, the colonel, being mounted and leading his intrepid band, received a severe flesh-wound in his arm. But, nothing daunted, he still retained command until some time after, when Lieut.-Colonel Walker came up, when he turned it over to him. He soon effected a union with the remainder of the regiment, and with Major Thomas Harrison, led until the final surrender at eleven o'clock. During these four bloody hours, this small number, soon reduced below a hundred, did the work assigned to a thousand men, and undoubtedly to their gallantry, persistent determination, and unflinching charges upon these camps, is mainly attributable the final glorious issue. No blame can be imputed to the other three fourths of the regiment, that kept them from participating in this most honorable and desperate conflict, for they w
family, there was a meeting of citizens in regard to my case, and I was finally released on parole of honor as a prisoner of war. In conclusion, I would say that the men under my command fought well, considering the quality of their arms and being perfectly raw recruits. Great praise is due Lieutenant-Colonel J. J. Landrum for his coolness and bravery. The following-named officers of Colonel Metcalfe's regiment acted well and did credit to themselves, to wit: Captain Robert Scott of Harrison, Captain W. W. Bradly of Berry's Station, Captain Benjamin Robins of Falmouth, Captain Sharp of Bath County. Respectfully, W. O. Smith. Surgeon Lair's letter. Cynthiana, Ky., July 22, 1862. Having seen so many exaggerated reports of our defence against the band of thieves headed by John Morgan, who made an attack upon our little band of patriots last Thursday, with a force of six to one, I feel somewhat disposed to make a few corrections. As I was present during the entire
tion, in what States and parts of States insurrection exists: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim that the States of South-Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, North-Carolina, and the State of Virginia, except the following counties, Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, Marshall, Wetzel, Marion, Monongalia, Preston, Taylor, Pleasants, Tyler, Ritchie, Doddridge, Harrison, Wood, Jackson, Wirt, Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Barbour, Tucker, Lewis, Braxton, Upshur, Randolph, Mason, Putnam, Kanawha, Clay, Nicholas, Cabell, Wayne, Boone, Logan, Wyoming, Webster, Fayette, and Raleigh, are now in insurrection and rebellion, and by reason thereof the civil authority of the United States is obstructed so that the provisions of the Act to provide increased revenue from imports to pay the interest on the public debt, and for other purposes, approved August fifth, eighteen h