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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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s held, to take action in behalf of the families of volunteers from that district. B. R. Winthrop occupied the chair. Resolutions were adopted, and speeches were made by F. A. Conkling, Chauncey Schaeffer, John Cochrane and others.--N. Y. Tribune, April 27. A Union meeting at Bedford, Westchester county, N. Y., this afternoon, on the occasion of raising the flag, was addressed by Senator Hall, John Jay, Rev. M. Bogg, of the Episcopal Church, Rev. Mr. Ferris, Dr. Woodcock, Dr. Shores, Mr. Hart, Captain of the Bedford company, Mr. Brown, of the Croton Falls Company, and others.--N. Y. Times, April 27. John W. Ellis, governor of North Carolina, issued a proclamation calling an extra session of the General Assembly of the State, and deprecating the proclamation of President Lincoln asking for troops.--(Doc. 103.) The bridges over Gunpowder River on the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad were burned by the rebels of Baltimore. The bridge over Bush River, on th
ine battery.--riots occurred at Troy, N. Y., and Boston, Mass., both of which were suppressed without much trouble.--(Doc. 128.) General Thomas's corps of the army of the Cumberland, following in the rear of General Bragg's retreating forces, reached Elk River, and encountered a portion of General Buckner's division of infantry and artillery together with a part of Wheeler's cavalry, whom they dispersed after a short skirmish.--the rebels under General Morgan reached Miamiville, on the Little Miami road, this morning, tore up the track and committed other outrages.--(Doc. 47.) Joe Hart, the rebel guerrilla, was killed near Chillicothe, Mo., by a detachment of militia under Lieutenant Gibbs, of the Fourth Provisional regiment.--the cavalry belonging to General Meade's army occupied Falling Waters, having overtaken and captured a brigade of infantry one thousand five hundred strong, two guns, two caissons, two battle-flags, and a large number of small-arms.--(Docs. 97 and 104.)
a severe rain-storm which had been pouring all day, and the mud was knee-deep; yet the rebels were gallantly charged, dispersed, and chased ten miles, their camp destroyed, about twenty killed, and seventy wounded and taken prisoners. The remainder made good their escape by recrossing the river into King William County. The Union force comprised the Forty-fifth, Sixth, and Twenty-second National colored troops the First New York Mounted Rifles, the Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, parts of Hart's and Belger's batteries, and some five hundred of Kilpatrick's Richmond raiders. The only organized rebel force encountered were the Fifth and Ninth Virginia cavalry, having, however, many mounted and armed, though ununiformed citizens in their ranks, who claimed to be non-combatants. On the raid large amounts of grain, provisions, arms, etc., were destroyed. One mill filled with corn belonging to the Ninth Virginia cavalry was turned. Several of Lee's soldiers at home on recruiting se