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ary lines or territory, while the United States Government was compelled to organize and employ several classes of spies and detectives all over the North, for the purpose of suppressing bounty-jumpers, fraudulent discharges, trade in contra- Nancy Hart the Confederate guide and spy The women of the mountain districts of Virginia were as ready to do scout and spy work for the Confederate leaders as were their men-folk. Famous among these fearless girls who knew every inch of the regions in which they lived was Nancy Hart. So valuable was her work as a guide, so cleverly and often had she led Jackson's cavalry upon the Federal outposts in West Virginia, that the Northern Government offered a large reward for her capture. Lieutenant-Colonel Starr of the Ninth West Virginia finally caught her at Summerville in July, 1862. While in a temporary prison, she faced the camera for the first time in her life, displaying more alarm in front of the innocent contrivance than if it had been
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, Nancy 1765-1840 (search)
Hart, Nancy 1765-1840 Patriot; born in Elbert county, Ga., in 1765. During the Revolutionary War she was an ardent patriot, and upon one occasion captured five British soldiers, who were pillaging her house. She concealed their arms and killed two of them who attempted to escape, and held the remaining three until she received assistance from the neighbors. She died in 1840.
ack Beall, First Corporal; Miss Lelia Pullen, Second Corporal; Miss Sallie Bull, Third Corporal; Miss Ella Key, Treasurer. The corps not having a name, and it being their determination to prepare to defend their homes, if necessary, as did Nancy Hart of olden time, we have taken the liberty of calling them the "Nancy Harts," until they shall adopt one. We have no doubt they will prove as true as did Nancy Hart if the emergency ever presents itself; and, therefore, we do not think a more aporporal; Miss Ella Key, Treasurer. The corps not having a name, and it being their determination to prepare to defend their homes, if necessary, as did Nancy Hart of olden time, we have taken the liberty of calling them the "Nancy Harts," until they shall adopt one. We have no doubt they will prove as true as did Nancy Hart if the emergency ever presents itself; and, therefore, we do not think a more appropriate name could be suggested. The "Nancy Harts" of LaGrange! That's it, ladies.