hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for David L. Hart or search for David L. Hart in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

carried off the field. The Seventy-first lay there as ordered, when an aid from Col. Burnside rode up and asked for the field officers. Col. Martin then ordered us forward. Prior to this some of the Seventy-first had gone over to the First Rhode Island, and were fighting in their ranks. Boroughs, commissary of the Seventy-first, rode up in front of us, dismounted from his horse, and told the boys to go in and fight on their own account, which they did with a will. Just prior to this Capt. Hart, of Company A, had been wounded and carried from the field; also Capt. Ellis, of Company F. Then Lieut. Oakley came on. Going forward to the brow of the hill he received a shot in the leg of his pantaloons from one of his own men. Some time after this the firing ceased upon both sides. McDowell, with his staff, then rode through our lines, receiving a cheer from the Seventy-first, and passed down the hill to the left, within 600 feet of the enemy's line. After that the brigade fell b
ccess is complete, and almost bloodless. I doubt whether Wise and Johnson will unite and overpower me. The behavior of the troops in the action and toward the prisoners was admirable. G. B. McClellan, Major-Gen. Commanding. Statement of David L. Hart. Clarksburg, Va., June 16, 1861. The following is the statement of Mr. David L. Hart, the guide to General Rosecrans' column at the battle, which was fought on his father's farm: I was with General Rosecrans as guide at the battle Mr. David L. Hart, the guide to General Rosecrans' column at the battle, which was fought on his father's farm: I was with General Rosecrans as guide at the battle of Rich Mountain. The enemy--four thousand strong — were strongly intrenched at the foot of the mountain on the west side. They had rolled whole trees from the mountain side and lapped them together, filling in with stones and earth from a trench outside. General McClellan, after reconnoitring their position, sent General Rosecrans with the Eighth, Tenth, and Fifteenth Indiana Regiments, the Nineteenth Ohio and the Cincinnati cavalry, to get in their rear. I went with him as guide. We star
tion, inquired of Col. Dougherty what should be done next. Take the Court House or bust, was the emphatic answer — and we did take it. The volleys from the windows passed over our heads, or fell at our feet. Those that did not escape from the windows were killed or taken prisoners, and when we emerged again from the house the enemy were to be seen fleeing in the dim distance. We leisurely retraced our steps. At the railroad track we met the detached portion of our regiment, under Lieut.-Col. Hart. They had passed straight forward without turning off, and were just returning to our assistance. They had fallen in with the flying enemy, and killed sixteen of them. All returned to Capt. Abbott's encampment with twenty-one horses and eighteen prisoners, having been less than two hours absent. Here Capt. Jackson was ordered to remain with his command, and the rest of us seated ourselves upon the cars, and moved proudly back to Bird's Point, which we reached in. good time, and with