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Doc. 10.-the Southern Prisons. Chaplain James Harvey's account. given in a Lecture at Piqua, Ohio. whoever may forget the interests and the glory of our common country, the soldier, whether in the field or in the prison, never forgets it or forgets us. And whoever may forget the loved ones at home, those upon the field and in the prison never forget them. I have heard many prayers in the Libby Prison, and whoever was offering prayer, whether a Chaplain, Captain, Lieutenant, Surgeon, Colonel, or Lieutenant-Colonel, Major or Brigadier-General, (for we had a Brigadier-General there that offered public prayer in the prison,) all the prisoners were willing to hear, and when they invoked the divine blessing for the loved ones at home, in spite of all self-control a tear would gather in their eyes, and there would be tremor in the voice as they remembered those that were far away. As we are here tonight, not in prison, but under the aegis of the stars and stripes, permitted to
Federal army might be compelled to attack us in a position of our own choosing, or to a retreat easily converted into rout. After we crossed the Etowah five detachments of cavalry were successively sent with instructions to destroy as much as they could of the railroad between Dalton and the Etowah. All failed — because too weak. We could never spare a sufficient body of cavalry for this service, as its assistance was absolutely necessary in the defence of every position we occupied. Captain Harvey, an officer of great courage and sagacity, was detached on this service with one hundred men on the eleventh of June, and remained for several weeks near the railroad, frequently interrupting, although not strong enough to prevent its use. Early in the campaign, the statements of the strength of the cavalry in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, given me by Lieutenant-General Polk, just from the command of that department, and my telegraphic correspondence with his successo
n this, as I have stated, our social fabric is firmly planted; and I cannot permit myself to doubt the ultimate success of a full recognition of this principle throughout the civilized and enlightened world. As I have stated, the truth of this principle may be slow in development, as all truths are, and ever have been, in the various branches of science. It was so with the principles announced by Galileo — it was so with Adam Smith and his principles of political economy. It was so with Harvey, and his theory of the circulation of the blood. It is stated that not a single one of the medical profession, living at the time of the announcement of the truths made by him, admitted them. Now, they are universally acknowledged. May we not therefore look with confidence to the ultimate universal acknowledgment of the truths upon which our system rests? It is the first Government ever instituted upon principles in strict conformity to nature, and the ordination of Providence, in furnis
B--Capt., W. Jatho; First Lieutenant, John Ehrenberg; Second Lieutenant, Samuel Wool. Company C--Capt., Charles Angeroth; First Lieutenant, Augustus Riedt; Second Lieutenant, Gustavus H. Bopp. Company D--Capt., Jacob Keifer; First Lieutenant, Hermann A. Vogelbach. Company E--Capt., Albert N. Kidney; First Lieutenant, Charles Friele; Second Lieutenant, Francis Bierwith. Company F--Capt., Chauncey Spering; First Lieutenant, C. S. Harrington; Second Lieutenant, John M. Carson. Company G--Capt., James Harvey; First Lieutenant, Martin C. Frost; Second Lieutenant, Lawrence Kelley. Company H--Capt., Raphael Vogel; First Lieutenant, Albert Heubel; Second Lieutenant, Lewis F. Resay. Company I--Capt., John M. Lang; First Lieutenant, Walter F. Evans; Second Lieutenant, John H. Steiner. Company K--Capt., Duplat Hagemeister; First Lieutenant, Henry Memminger; Second Lieutenant, Peter A. McKoon. The men are armed with percussion-cap smoothedbore muskets, and their uniforms are of dark blue cloth.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 39: capture of the regiment. (search)
lly. Edward C. Thompson. Thomas Hall. Michael O'Leary. James Skerrett. SergeantRobert J. Gamble. SergeantJames Clark. CorporalWilliam H. Lambert. CorporalElijah E. H. Mansur. CorporalGeorge E. Morse. Edward Golden. William Haywood. Thomas Hill. James McCarthy. John McMannus. Levi Woofindale. George B. Symonds. Michael Broderick. John P. Driscoll. Benjamin Lummus. John Restell, Jr. Joshua Very. James Shinnick. Charles Becker. SergeantJames S. Smith. William Blake. James Harvey. Edwin B. Pratt. CorporalWilliam P. Edwards. Stephen J. Younger. Benjamin F. Adams. John Lee (Co. F.) John Lee (Co. I.) Job Foster. William Richardson. James Beatty. Richard Doherty. Thomas Meagher. Edward Joy. James Smith. William Smith. Peter Johnson. John Hagan. Ernest Krantz. Edward McKenna. Eben D. Poole. William Farnham. Charles Dean. These 67 recruits had been forwarded to the regiment only the day before and were captured with the others. Co. A.Rob
............................. 18, 29 Harris, Seth M....................................................... 145 Harrison, James M .................................................. 292 Harrison's Island............................................ 17, 20, 21, 25 Harrison's Landing...................................102, 109, 113, 114, 115 Harrow, General.................................................. 233, 246 Hartsuff, Brigadier General..................................... 142 Harvey, James...................................................... 329 Harvey, Daniel P................................................. 107, 108 Harvey, Patrick...................................................... 249 Harvey, Patrick W...............................................288, 324 Haskens, Edward..................................................... 331 Hastings, Horace..................................................... 300 Hatcher's Run..............................................