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orces, Col. Anderson marched down the island some five or six miles, and bivouacked near the barricade constructed across the island at the marshes. In going down he passed under the fire of the ships, but the men marched through it with the greatest coolness and determination. The guns in Fort Bartow were very skilfully used, and (lid good service throughout the day. The battery was manned by two companies of the Seventeenth North-Carolina, under Major Hill, the State guards, and the John Harvey guards, but only the former company was brought into immediate action, as the guns were ranged rather too much up the channel. Only three guns could be used during the fight, a rifle and a howitzer, en barbette, and one embrasure gun. These three, however, were so well manned that no one of the hostile ships passed up far enough to come within range of the second embrasure gun. The men fought with great coolness and intrepidity, and showed conclusively what they could do under experience
ShipOcean EagleT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthE. Bangs & SonBoston627 4711852ShipGem of the OceanT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthWilliam LincolnBoston730 472 ShipAlexanderT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthBaxter & BrothersYarmouth601 473 ShipGolden EagleT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthWilliam LincolnBoston1109 474 ShipChampionJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonWilliam PerkinsBoston1061 475 ShipPhantomS. Lapham'sS. LaphamJ. E. LodgeBoston1300 476 ShipBeverlyP. Curtis'sP. CurtisWilliam PerkinsBoston682 477 Stmr.Sir John HarveyJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisClark, Jones, & Co.Boston700 478 ShipOnwardJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisReed & WadeBoston872 479 ShipStar of the UnionJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisReed & WadeBoston1079 480 ShipWhirlwindJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisW. & F. H. Whittemore & Co.Boston990 481 ShipCompetitorJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisW. F. Weld & Co.Boston850 482 ShipNational EagleJ. T. Foster'sJ. T. FosterFisher & Co.Boston1060 483 ShipEllen FosterJ. T. Foster'sJ. T. FosterJ. & A. TirrellBoston1042
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
1627. He returned to England the following spring. In the spring of 1629 he went again to Avalon, taking with him his wife and unmarried children. The following winter was a severe one, and he began to contemplate a desertion of the domain on account of the rigorous climate. He sent his children home. In the autumn he actually abandoned Newfoundland, and with his wife and retainers sailed to Virginia, where, because he refused to take the oath of allegiance, he was ordered away by Governor Harvey. His wife and retainers remained there during the winter. Going from there in the spring, it is supposed he explored the shores of Chesapeake Bay, and close that region for a settlement. In 1632, Lord Baltimore obtained a charter from Charles I. of the territory on the Chesapeake now forming the State of Maryland. What will you call the country? asked the King. Baltimore referred the matter to his Majesty. Then let us name it after the Queen (Henrietta Maria), said Charles, and cal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Calvert, Leonard (search)
which split the sails of the Ark, unshipped her rudder, and left her at the mercy of the waves, the voyagers were in despair, and doubted not the little Dove had gone to the bottom of the ocean. Delightful weather ensued, and at Barbadoes the Dove joined the Ark after a separation of six weeks. Sailing northward, they touched at Point Comfort, at the entrance to the Chesapeake, and then went up to Jamestown, with royal letters borne by Calvert, and received there a kind reception from Governor Harvey. They tarried nine days, and then entered the Potomac River, which delighted them. The colonists sailed up the river to the Heron Islands, and, at a little past the middle of March, landed on one of them, which they named St. Clement's. On the 25th they offered the sacrifice of the mass, set up a huge cross hewn from a tree, and knelt in solemn devotion around it. Going farther up, they entered a river which they called St. George; and on the right bank founded the capital of the ne
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Claiborne, or Clayborne, William 1589- (search)
landers were repulsed, and one of their number was killed. Claiborne was indicted for and found guilty of constructive murder and other high crimes, and fled to Virginia. Kent Island was seized and confiscated by the Maryland authorities. Sir John Harvey, governor of Virginia, refused to surrender Claiborne, and he went to England to seek redress. After the King heard his story he severely reprimanded Lord Baltimore for violating royal commands in driving Claiborne from Kent Island. In thxcitement. The first Maryland Assembly, which had convened just before the event, decreed that offenders in all murders and felonies shall suffer the same pains and forfeitures as for the same crimes in England. A requisition was made upon Governor Harvey for the delivery of Claiborne. That functionary decided that Claiborne might go to England to justify his conduct before the home government. A court of inquiry—held three years afterwards to investigate the matter—resulted in a formal ind
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
lared martial law in two counties; and for this articles of impeachment were preferred against him, and he was removed from office. Population in 1890, 1,617,947; in 1900, 1,893,810. See Amidas, Philip; United States, North Carolina, in vol. IX. proprietary governors. Colony of Albemarle. William Drummondappointed1863 Samuel StephensappointedOct., 1667 George Cartwrightpresident of council1674 —Millerpresident of councilJuly, 1677 John Culpeperusurps the governm'tDec., 1677 John Harveypresident of council1680 John Jenkinsappointed governorJune, 1680 Henry Wilkinsonappointed governorFeb., 1681 Seth Sothelappointed governor1683 Philip Ludwellappointed governor1689 Alexander Lillingtonappointed deputy gov1693 Thomas Harveyappointed deputy gov1695 North Carolina. Henderson Walkerpresident of council1699 Robert Danielappointed deputy gov1704 Thomas Careyappointed deputy gov1705 William Gloverpresident of councilMay, 1709 Edward Hydepresident of councilAug., 171
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
egislature and assume control......December, 1677 Culpeper goes to England to explain to the lords proprietors, and John Harvey, president of the council, takes charge of the government, John Jenkins, being appointed governor by the proprietors, escape after his defeat at Culloden) and her husband, who settle near the present site of Fayetteville......1773 Col. John Harvey, former speaker of the Assembly, calls a convention to form a provincial congress, which meets at Newbern; Harvey isHarvey is chosen speaker......Aug. 25, 1774 The provincial congress decides that after Sept. 1, 1774, all use of East India tea should be prohibited; that after Nov 1, 1774, importation of African slaves should cease; and that after Jan. 1, 1775, no East Iirs; sign and forward to the Continental Congress at Philadelphia a declaration of independence......May 20, 1775 Col. John Harvey dies at his home at Harvey's Neck, Perquimans county......June, 1775 Articles of agreement to resist force by for
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
Church of England......1629-30 Governor Potts superseded as governor by Sir John Harvey......March, 1630 Trouble with Maryland as to land titles......1632-44 .....1634 William Clayborne, a Virginian contestant, sent to England by Governor Harvey to answer for attempting to establish his claim against Maryland......1635 Governor Harvey deposed by the Virginia Assembly, and commissioners appointed to impeach him in England. He accompanies the commission......1635 John West acting governor during the absence of Governor Harvey......1635-36 Harvey, reinstated by Charles, returns......1637 Sir Francis Wyatt succeeds Harvey as governorHarvey, reinstated by Charles, returns......1637 Sir Francis Wyatt succeeds Harvey as governor......November, 1639 Sir William Berkeley appointed governor, and arrives in Virginia......February, 1642 Massachusetts sends three clergymen to Virginia at theHarvey as governor......November, 1639 Sir William Berkeley appointed governor, and arrives in Virginia......February, 1642 Massachusetts sends three clergymen to Virginia at the request of Puritans there......1642 Virginia Assembly enacts that all ministers in the colony shall conform to the order and constitution of the Church of England
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wisconsin, (search)
laims to hold the office.......Jan. 17, 1856 Supreme Court decides that Barstow has been counted in upon fraudulent returns; Lieutenant-Governor McArthur fills the office for four days, when Coles Bashford assumes office......March 21, 1856 First railway reaches the Mississippi River at Prairie du Chien......April 15, 1857 First Wisconsin Regiment mustered into service......May 17, 1861 About 700 Confederate prisoners are received at Camp Randall, Madison......April, 1862 Governor Harvey dies on his way to the battle-field of Shiloh to look after the welfare of Wisconsin soldiers......April, 1862 Personal liberty law repealed......July, 1862 Negro-suffrage amendment to the constitution rejected by vote of 55,591 to 46,588......November, 1865 Home for soldiers' orphans opened Jan. 1, 1866; established by private subscription, becomes a State institution......March 31, 1866 Fourth Regiment Wisconsin Cavalry mustered out after a service of five years and one da
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colony of Virginia, (search)
ore than 2,000 remained. The same year the London Company was dissolved by a writ of quo warranto, and Virginia became a royal province. George Yeardly was appointed governor, with twelve councillors. He died in 1627, and was succeeded by Sir John Harvey, a haughty and unpopular ruler. Harvey was deposed by the Virginians in 1635, but was reinstated by Charles I., and ruled until 1639. Sir William Berkeley became governor in 1641, at the beginning of the civil war in England, and being a thHarvey was deposed by the Virginians in 1635, but was reinstated by Charles I., and ruled until 1639. Sir William Berkeley became governor in 1641, at the beginning of the civil war in England, and being a thorough loyalist, soon came in contact with the republican Parliament. The colonists, also, remained loyal, and invited the son of the beheaded King to come and reign over them. Cromwell sent commissioners and a fleet to Virginia. A compromise with the loyalists was effected. Berkeley gave way to Richard Bennett, one of the commissioners, who became governor. But when Charles II. was restored, Berkeley, who had not left Virginia, was reinstated; the laws of the colony were revived; restri
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