hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William Thompson Haskell or search for William Thompson Haskell in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarkable record of the Haskells of South Carolina. (search)
xey Gregg, later on the staff of General A. P. Hill, and surrendered at Appomattox as captain on the staff of Fighting Dick Anderson, of his own State. He married Miss Ella Wardlaw, of Abbeville, dying in 1886, and leaving three sons and one daughter, all adults. Charles Thompson Haskell was the second son, a captain in the First Carolina Regulars, and was killed on Morris Island when Gilmore landed to attack Charleston in July, 1863. He, happily, left no widow. The next was William Thompson Haskell. He was captain of Company H, First South Carolina volunteers, and died at the charge of that corps at Gettysburg while commanding under A. P. Hill. Alexander Cheves Haskell lived through the day of Appomattox. He was colonel of the Seventh South Carolina Cavalry, of ruddy record, and still lives at Columbia. His first marriage was one of the most touching romances of the war. Miss Rebecca Singleton was a dainty and lovely, but high spirited, daughter of that famed old name.