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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
ther by the storm or by other causes, and on last Saturday he took a special steamer to Washington, to consult the military oracles at the Federal seat of Government. Sunday I heard of his being closeted with President Lincoln, Secretary Stanton, and General Halleck. I suppose we shall have a new programme next week. You had better finish all the gloves you intend making at once, and send them to the army. Next month they will be much needed. After that no use for this winter. Tell Mr. Haskins I am delighted the turkey was so good. I was that day up at United States Mine Ford, on the Rappahannock. Did not get back till late at night. After our nocturnal repast was over, having been on horseback from early breakfast, you can imagine how I would have enjoyed it. I was, however, thinking so much of General Burnside's playing us such a shabby trick, running off to Washington when we were waiting for him, that I did not then miss my dinner. General Lee was surrounded by embarr
, ‘64 146th Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.         8 8 8     May, ‘64 147th Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.         22 22 22   Twenty-sec'd. May, ‘64 148th Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.       2 37 39 39 Ferry's Tenth. May, ‘64 149th Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.   4 4   38 38 42   Eighth. May, ‘64 150th Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.   2 2   10 10 12   Twenty-sec'd. May, ‘64 151st Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.         10 10 10 Haskins's Twenty-sec'd. May, ‘64 152d Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.   1 1   20 20 21     May, ‘64 153d Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days. 1 2 3   26 26 29     May, ‘64 154th Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.   1 1   3 3 4     May, ‘64 155th Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.         20 20 20     May, ‘64 156th Ohio Enlisted for one hundred days.       1 22 23 23     May, ‘64 157th Ohio Enlis
e killed, 76 wounded, many of them mortally, and 30 are missing. Among the killed were C. H. Bennet, adjutant of the regiment, Capt. Blackwell, and Lieut. Hughes. Col. Rives' squadron of cavalry, (dismounted,) numbering some 234 men, lost 4 killed and 8 wounded. Among the former were Lieut.-Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely wounded. Capts. Farris and Halleck, and Lieut. Haskins, were killed. Gen. Clark's cavalry, together with the Windsor Guards, were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and 5 wounded. Brig.-Gen. McBride's division (605 men) lost 22 killed, 67 severely wounded, and 57 slightly wounded. Col. Foster and Capts. Nichols, Dougherty, Armstrong, and Mings were wounded while gallantly leading their respective commands. Gen. Parson's brigade, 256 infantry and artillery, under command respectively of C
e killed, 76 wounded, many of them mortally, and 30 are missing. Among the killed were C. H. Bennet, adjutant of the regiment, Capt. Blackwell, and Lieut. Hughes. Col. Rives' squadron of cavalry, (dismounted,) numbering some 234 men, lost 4 killed and 8 wounded. Among the former were Lieut.-Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely wounded. Capts. Farris and Halleck, and Lieut. Haskins, were killed. Gen. Clark's cavalry, together with the Windsor Guards, were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and 5 wounded. Brig.-Gen. McBride's division (605 men) lost 22 killed, 67 severely wounded, and 57 slightly wounded. Col. Foster and Capts. Nichols, Dougherty, Armstrong, and Mings were wounded while gallantly leading their respective commands. Gen. Parson's brigade, 256 infantry and artillery, under command respectively of C
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 6: Louisiana. 1859-1861. (search)
rts had no garrisons, but the arsenal was held by a small company of artillery, commanded by Major Haskins, a most worthy and excellent officer, who had lost an arm in Mexico. I remember well that Ix to one of whites; and it was on his official demand that the United States Government ordered Haskins's company to replace Rickett's. This company did not number forty men. In the night of January went up from New Orleans by boat, landed, surrounded the arsenal, and demanded its surrender. Haskins was of course unprepared for such a step, yet he at first resolved to defend the post as he besade between the two new fragments for all the property stored in the arsenal. Of course it was Haskins's duty to have defended his post to the death; but up to that time the national authorities in pusillanimity, that the officers of the army knew not what to do. The result, anyhow, was that Haskins surrendered his post, and at once embarked for St. Louis. The arms and munitions stored in the
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
y.--Thirty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Vandever. Nicholasville, Kentucky.--Twenty-first Ohio, Colonel Norton; Thirty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Bradley. Big Hill.--Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Connell. Colesburg.--Twenty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Hecker. Elizabethtown, Kentucky.--Nineteenth Illinois, Colonel Turchin. Owensboroa or Henderson.--Thirty-first Indiana, Colonel Cruft; Colonel Edwards, forming Rock Castle; Colonel Boyle, Harrodsburg; Colonel Barney, Irvine; Colonel Hazzard, Burksville; Colonel Haskins, Somerset. And, in order to conclude this subject, I also add copies of two telegraphic dispatches, sent for General McClellan's use about the same time, which are all the official letters received at his headquarters, as certified by the Adjutant-General, L. Thomas, in a letter of February 1, 1862, in answer to an application of my brother, Senator John Sherman, and on which I was adjudged insane: Louisville, November 8, 10 P. M. To General McClellan, Washington, D. C.: Di
and raises a column in a glass tube. Mer-cu′ri-al horn-ore. Horn quicksilver. Mer-cu′ri-al Lev′el. A form of level in which mercury is used. Mer-cu′ri-al Pen′du-lum. A compensation pendulum invented by Graham of London, 1700. A jar of mercury is used for the bob or weight. As the pendulum expands the mercury rises, and by the rise of its center of gravity compensates for the other inequality. See pendulum. Mercurial pump. Mer-cu′ri-al pump. A pump invented by Haskins in 1720, in which a column of mercury acts as plunger and piston packing. Fig. 3123 shows a pump of this form. a is the chamber of the pump, with a valve at each end opening upwardly. b is the suction-pipe, and c the outlet. A bent tube connects chamber a with cylinder d, open at bottom and surrounded by a large cylinder or cup e filled with mercury, or with a wooden core to save a portion of the mercury, as in the illustration. If now the cup e be lowered, the tendency will
ward et al.Aug. 31, 1869. 95,320CarpenterSept. 28, 1869. 97,856BairdDec. 14, 1869. 103,745Howard et al.May 31, 1870. 117,364BairdJuly 25, 1871. 121,328BurnamNov. 28, 1871. 121,477WilkinsDec. 5, 1871. 123,742TaitFeb. 13, 1872. (Reissue.)4,794BairdMar. 12, 1872. 134,345BairdDec. 31, 1872. 134,346BairdDec. 31, 1872. 134,347BairdDec. 31, 1872. (Reissue.)5,306Howard et al.Mar. 4, 1873. (Reissue.)5,336Howard et al.Mar. 25, 1873. 144,672Hansen et al.Nov. 18, 1873. 146,000HaskinsDec. 30, 1873. (Reissue.)5,728Howard et al.Jan. 13, 1874. 156,048VogelOct. 20, 1874. class F. — miscellaneous parts. 1. Bobbin-Winders. No.Name.Date. 36,899FinkleNov. 11, 1862. 39,236Lewis et al.July 14, 1863. 80,908CallenAug. 11, 1868. 110,267MoffittDec. 20, 1870. 114,442JenksMay 2, 1871. 115,124SmithMay 23, 1871. (Reissue.)4,571PalmerOct. 3, 1871. 122,858SheldenJan. 16, 1872. 123,625FishFeb. 13, 1872. 123,852YoungFeb. 20, 1872. 124,667Day et al.Mar. 19, 1872.
, 1863. Company L organized January, 1864, and Company M February, 1864. Attached to Defenses of Washington August, 1862, to February, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps. Defenses North of the Potomac to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 24, 1864. 1sty as Pontooneers, McDowell's Dept. of the Rappahannock, April to June, 1862. Pontooneers, 3rd Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 1st Brigade, Haskins' Division, Defenses of Washington, to February, 1863. Battery assigned to 1st Maine Heavy Artillery as Company M March 28, 1863. Attached to Haskins' DivisiHaskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, to February, 1864. Detached from 1st Maine Heavy Artillery and reorganized as 3rd Battery February 23, 1864. Attached to Camp Barry. Defenses of Washington, 22nd Corps, April to July, 1864. Artillery, 3rd Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1864. Artillery Reserve, Army of the
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
of the Potomac, to February, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 6Washington, D. C. Regiment attached to 3rd Brigade, Haskins' Division, Defenses of Washington, D. C., to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to March, 1864. 3rd Brigashington, D. C., to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Haskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, to April, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Haskins' DiviHaskins' Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1864. Service. Duty in the Defenses of Washington north of the Potomac, a Potomac, to October, 1862. 2nd and 3rd Brigade, Haskins' Division, north of the Potomac, to March, 1863. 2nd and 3rd Brigades, Haskins' Division, north of the Potomac, 22nd Army Corps, to April, 1863. 1st Brigade
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