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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Shiloh. (search)
Frederick Behr (k). Brigade loss: k, 137; w, 444; m, 70=651. Second Brigade, Col. David Stuiart (w), Lieut.-Col. Oscar Malmborg (temporarily), Col. T. Kilby Smith: 55th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Oscar Malmborg; 54th Ohio, Col. T. Kilby Smith, Lieut.-Col. James A. Farden; 71st Ohio, Col. Rodney Mason. Brigade loss: k, 80; w, 380; m, 90 = 550. Third Brigade, Col. Jesse Hildebrand: 53d Ohio, Col. J. J. Appler, Lieut.-Col. Robert A. Fulton; 57th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Americus V. Rice; 77th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Wills De Hass, Maj. Benjamin D. Fearing. Brigade loss: k, 70; w, 222; m, 65= 356. Fourth Brigade, Col. Ralph Buckland: 48th Ohio, Col. Peter J. Sullivan (w), Lieut.-Col. Job R. Parker; 70th Ohio, Col. Joseph R. Cockerill; 72d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Herman Canfield (k), Col. Ralph P. Buckland. Brigade loss: k, 36; w, 203; m, 74 = 313. Cavalry: 1st and 2d Battalions, 4th Ill., Col. T. Lyle Dickey. Cavalry loss: w, 6. Artillery, Maj. Ezra Taylor: B, 1st Ill., Capt. Samuel E. Barrett; E, 1st Ill., Cap
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
The battle of Shiloh. Colonel Wills De Hass. The 6th of April, 1862, was a day fraught with momentous issues for the future of the American Republic. The evening of the 5th had witnessed the concentration of a great army, whose leaders had boastingly declared in the pride of their strength should, on the coming morn, overwhelm and destroy the army of the Union which lay encamped in conscious security around the wilderness church of Shiloh! At no period during our prolonged and sanguinary civil war was the Union more imperiled than on that eventful Saturday evening. The battle of Shiloh was the first decisive and, pre-eminently, the most important of the war. Defeat then would have been the greatest disaster that could have befallen the arms of the Union. The country can never know the full danger of that hour, and the pen of the historian can never portray the peril which hung over the Army of the Tennessee. Congress received the announcement of events then culminating in pr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
Rosengarten; Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg, by Major J. E. Carpenter; How Jefferson Davis was overtaken, by Major-General Wilson; Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid, by Colonel J. E. McGowan; On the Field of Fredericksburg, by Hon. D. Watson Rowe; Recollections of General Reynolds, by General T. F. McCoy; Some recollections of Grant, by S. H. M. Byers; The Baltimore Riots, by Frederic Emory; The battle of Beverly ford, by Colonel F. C. Newhall; The battle of Shiloh, by Colonel Wills De Hass; The campaign of Gettysburg, by Major-General Alfred Pleasonton; The capture of Mason and Slidell, by R. M. Hunter; The draft Riots in New York, by Major T. P. McElrath; The famous fight at Cedar creek, by General A. B. Nettleton; The First attack on Fort Fisher, by Benson J. Lossing, Ll. D.; The First cavalry, by Captain James A. Stevenson; The First great crime of the war, by Major-General W. B. Franklin; The First iron-clad Monitor, by Hon. Gideon Welles; The F