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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 6 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 5 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hatton or search for Hatton in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
), was one of the brightest belles. (note.—Next portion of Diary to April 14th, lost.) While in camp near Fredericksburg obtained a week's furlough to visit Richmond, and went there with Dr. Geo. Whitfield, our beloved surgeon. Stopped at Hatton's, on Mayo street between Franklin and Broad. Escorted Miss E. U. to Miss Nannie King's marriage. April 15. It rained hard all day, but I spent it in shopping. Bought a Confederate gray coat for $111.00, and got a few other articles. At ni Had gray coat cleaned and mended for $6.00, and bought a knife for $10.00. July 11th, 12th and 13th. Called on by many newspaper men and sick officers. We were first to reach the capitol from the Gettysburg field. Moved from hospital to Mr. Hatton's on Mayo street between Broad and Franklin. July 14. Examined by Dr. A. Y. P. Garnett, who recommended a 25 days furlough for me. Met Major W. M. Jones and Lieutenant L. B. Millican, of 9th Georgia, both wounded. July 15th and 16th. Re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fragments of war history relating to the coast defence of South Carolina, 1861-‘65, and the hasty preparations for the Battle of Honey Hill, November 30, 1864. (search)
Hewitt & Co. at Trenton, N. J. When Fernando Wood was elected mayor of New York he induced General Smith to accept the position of street commissioner, which he held until May, 1861, when he and his deputy, Mansfield Lovell, of Maryland, resigned and joined the Confederate army at Richmond. President Davis commissioned him major-general on September 19, 1861, and assigned him to the command of the 1st division, A. N. V., composed of the brigades of Whiting, Hood,, Hampton, Petigrew and Hatton. He did gallant service in the Peninsular campaign, and commanded the army at Fair Oaks for a short time, when General J. E. Johnston was wounded and carried from the field. About this time he was prostrated by a long and serious illness and was paralyzed. This he mentioned to Major Jenkins on the day of the battle when mounting a horse at Grahamville depot, which proved too spirited for him, when the gallant major exchanged with him, loaning his own horse, which was easy going and saf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Henry Chase Whiting, Major-General C. S. Army. (search)
derates attacked, but to meet bloody repulse. General Smith says: Believing that Whiting had, on the right, as much as he could well attend to, I went with Hatton's Brigade to the extreme front line of Hampton and Pettigrew in the woods, and soon learned that General Pettigrew had been wounded, it was supposed mortally, and was a prisoner. General Hatton was killed at my side just as his brigade reached the front line of battle, and in a very few minutes General Hampton was severely wounded. In this state of affairs, I sent word to General Whiting that I would take executive control in that wood, which would relieve him for the time of care for thr was issued by my direction: The division now commanded by Brigadier-General Whiting, and the brigades of Brigadier-General Pettigrew and BrigadierGen-eral Hatton will, until further orders, constitute one division under command of Brigadier-General Whiting. That division bore my name. My command, proper, at that time,