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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 6 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 5 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Hatton or search for Hatton in all documents.

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s permitted to retain the executive power till further instructions should arrive from England. Strong, 2 and 3. Langford, 7 and 8. Bacon's Preface. McMahon, 204, 205. Chalmers, 122. The dissolution of the Long Parliament threatened 1653. April. a change in the political condition of Maryland; for, it was argued, the only authority, under which Bennett and Clayborne had acted, had expired with the body from which it was derived. Langford, 10. Strong, 3. In consequence, Stone, Hatton and his friends, reinstated the rights of Lord 1654 Baltimore in their integrity; displacing all officers of the contrary party, they introduced the old council, and declared the condition of the colony, as settled by Bennett and Clayborne, to have been a state of rebellion. Strong, 3. Hazard, i. 626. The date is there 1653. It was in 1654, as Strong asserts. McMahon, 206, cites Hazard doubtingly. Bacon, 1654, c. XLV. Hammond, 22. A railing proclamation to that effect was published