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r departure, the vest, taking as it did considerable space, and adding no small weight to his already too heavy burden, was in many cases left behind. The officers, whose opportunity to take baggage along was greater, clung to them longest; but I think that they were quite generally abandoned with the first important reduction made in the luggage. One of the first supposed-to-be useful, if not ornamental stupidities, which some of the earlier troops took to themselves by order, was the Havelock. True, its invention antedated the time of which I speak. It was a foreign conception, and derived its name from an English general who distinguished himself in the war in India, where they were worn in 1857. It was a simple covering of white linen for the cap, _ with a cape depending for the protection of the neck from the sun. They may have been very essential to the comfort of the troops in the Eastern climate, but, while whole regiments went South with them, if one of these articles s
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 4: life in Lexington. (search)
n the prayer, that, if Jackson's was a morbid conscience, all Christians may be infected with the same disease. He has been often compared to Cromwell and to Havelock, but without justice in either case. The latter he certainly resembled in energy, in directness, in bravery, and in the vigor of his faith; but his spiritual chical, mellow, and noble. His ambition was more thoroughly chastened. He had risen to a calm and holy superiority to all the glitter of military glory, to which Havelock never attained. Had Jackson reared sons to succeed to his name, he would never, like him, have directed them to the bustling pursuits of arms in preference to the honor of winning souls, the calling which he most coveted for himself. Nor had he, either in manners or character, any of that abnormal vivacity which made Havelock as peculiar as he was great. The field on which his military genius was displayed, and the armies he wielded, were so large compared with those of the British c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The capture of Mr. Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States. (search)
avis. I am a Yankee, born between Saccarappa and Gorham Corner; am full of Yankee prejudices; but I think it wicked to lie even about him, or, for the matter, about the devil. I was with the party that captured Jeff. Davis; saw the whole transaction from its beginning. I now say-and hope you will publish it — that Jeff. Davis did not have on at the time he was taken any such garment as is worn by women. He did have over his shoulders a water-proof article of clothing-something like a Havelock. It was not in the least concealed. He wore a hat, and did not carry a pail of water on his head, nor carry pail, bucket or kettle in any way. To the best of my recollection, he carried nothing whatever in his hands. His wife did not tell any person that her husband might hurt some body if he got exasperated. She behaved like a lady, and he as a gentleman, though manifestly he was chagrined at being taken into custody. Our soldiers behaved like gentlemen, as they were, and our off
h the war. Taft's   4 4   13 13 17   Reserve Art'y. June, ‘61 6th N. Y. Reenlisted and served through the war. Bramhall's   8 8   9 9 17   Third. Sept., ‘61 7th N. Y. Reenlisted and served through the war. Regan's   4 4   27 27 31   Eighteenth. Oct., ‘61 8th N. Y. Reenlisted and served through the war. Fitch's         36 36 36   Fourth. June, ‘61 9th N. Y. Schubert's         4 4 4     April, ‘62 10th N. Y. Bruen's   2 2   9 9 11   Third. Jan., ‘62 11th N. Y. Havelock   8 8   13 13 21   Third. Jan., ‘62 12th N. Y. McKnight's 1 4 5   14 14 19   Second. Oct., ‘61 13th N. Y. Reenlisted and served through the war. Wheeler's 1 11 12   16 16 28   Eleventh. Dec., ‘61 14th N. Y. The 14th and 15th Batteries originally formed the 2d Battalion, N. Y. Light Artillery. Rorty's 2 3 5   4 4 9   Second. Dec., ‘61 15th N. Y. The 14th and 15th Batteries originally formed the 2d Battalion, N. Y. Light Ar
What one noble woman can do.--Mrs. Eliza Gray Fisher, a lady of Boston, Mass., past the age of threescore years, knowing from experience the necessities of the volunteer soldier, having lost a grandfather in the Revolutionary war, and a father in the war of 1812, determined, immediately upon the issue of the present call for volunteers, to provide a complete outfit of under clothing for an entire company. This, notwithstanding the severe pressure of domestic duties, with the aid of several ladies in Rev. Dr. Dewey's society, she has accomplished in the most satisfactory manner. The articles are as follows, and are of the best materials and most thorough work-manship:--130 shirts, 130 pairs of drawers, 130 towels, 130 pocket-handkerchiefs, 130 pairs of socks, 12 hospital gowns, 55 bags containing needles, pins, thread, &c., 65 Havelock caps, 500 yards bandages. Such women are of the true Revolutionary stock,--all honor to them.--Boston Transcript, May 27.
has been ascertained, and the position and intentions of certain rebel forces made fully apparent. The expedition is almost unparalleled in military movements, considering the time consumed and the distance travelled. The march rivals that of Havelock in India, where two hundred miles were passed over in five days and a half; and which led to Havelock's promotion from a captaincy to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Col. Dodge travelled one hundred and sixty-eight miles in four days, over corduroy roaHavelock's promotion from a captaincy to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Col. Dodge travelled one hundred and sixty-eight miles in four days, over corduroy roads, through the Dismal Swamp, where in some places the water was breast-high to the horses, and with the exception of the slight casualty at the bridge over the Perquimans, he brought in his men and horses in good condition. He travelled over sixty miles, along the chain of the enemy's outposts, with a small force of one hundred and forty men, beyond the reach of support, and in constant danger of being cut off. The officers of the expedition, and who have received the commendation of the comma
has been ascertained, and the position and intentions of certain rebel forces made fully apparent. The expedition is almost unparalleled in military movements, considering the time consumed and the distance travelled. The march rivals that of Havelock in India, where two hundred miles were passed over in five days and a half; and which led to Havelock's promotion from a captaincy to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Col. Dodge travelled one hundred and sixty-eight miles in four days, over corduroy roaHavelock's promotion from a captaincy to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Col. Dodge travelled one hundred and sixty-eight miles in four days, over corduroy roads, through the Dismal Swamp, where in some places the water was breast-high to the horses, and with the exception of the slight casualty at the bridge over the Perquimans, he brought in his men and horses in good condition. He travelled over sixty miles, along the chain of the enemy's outposts, with a small force of one hundred and forty men, beyond the reach of support, and in constant danger of being cut off. The officers of the expedition, and who have received the commendation of the comma
Energy of Yankee soldiers.--A party of rebel soldiers went up from Fort Macon and destroyed the most important bridge upon the railroad — that across the creek near Lucknow, or Newport station, eight miles below Havelock. The object was evidently to prevent the advance of the Union forces eastward, to Morehead City and Beaufort. On the Sunday following Major Wright, in command of the Fifth Rhode Island, arrived at the bridge, and, after examining its condition, reported to Generals Parke and Burnside, when the latter ordered the immediate reconstruction of the bridge. Major Wright, who is one of the most thorough civil engineers connected with the expedition, and a practical mechanic, was charged with the execution of the order, and Captain M. D. Field, with a party of mechanics, were detailed to cooperate. A number of colored mechanics, picked up in the neighborhood, were also brought into use. The bridge was a truss structure of one hundred and ninety feet span, and cost near
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
to the Mississippi squadron, keeping the Cumberland River open for the army. The sloop below, attached to the blockading squadron during the war, won quite a name for herself, although not engaged in any of the larger actions, by capturing a number of prizes. In 1861, under Captain C. Green, she caught the blockade-runner Alvarado and took the British vessel Aigburth at sea laden with contraband intended for the Confederacy. On December 15th, of the following year, she captured the ship Havelock and a large brig that was trying to make the coast, laden with cloth and percussion-caps. The Jamestown was ordered to the East Indies September 11, 1862, where she remained till after the war's close. She had a roving commission full of adventure. Admiral S. P. Lee North Atlantic blockading squadron, 1862 A fast sailer the sloop-of-war Jamestown took command of the North Atlantic, guarding the coast of Virginia and North Carolina, while Flag-Officer Du Pont was assigned to the S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
rush the whole line of redans from 5 to 9 inclusive. Scarcely had the assault ended, when Hancock came up with the Second corps, and though the ranking officer, with rare generosity, which recalls the chivalric conduct of Sir James Outram to Havelock in front of Lucknow, Outram's Divisional Order on night of September 16th, 1857--Brock's Life of Havelock, p. 213. at once offered his troops to Smith, and stood ready to receive the orders of his subordinate. The prize was now within his Havelock, p. 213. at once offered his troops to Smith, and stood ready to receive the orders of his subordinate. The prize was now within his grasp had he boldly advanced — and the moon shining brightly highly favored such enterprise — but Smith, it would seem, though possessed of considerable professional skill, was not endowed with that intuitive sagacity which swiftly discerns the chances of the moment, and thus halting on the very threshold of decisive victory, contented himself with partial success, and having relieved his divisions in the captured works with Hancock's troops, waited for the morning. Meanwhile, Hoke had arr
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