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has been ascertained, and the position and intentions of certain rebel forces made fully apparent. The expedition is almost unparalleled in military movements, considering the time consumed and the distance travelled. The march rivals that of Havelock in India, where two hundred miles were passed over in five days and a half; and which led to Havelock's promotion from a captaincy to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Col. Dodge travelled one hundred and sixty-eight miles in four days, over corduroy roaHavelock's promotion from a captaincy to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Col. Dodge travelled one hundred and sixty-eight miles in four days, over corduroy roads, through the Dismal Swamp, where in some places the water was breast-high to the horses, and with the exception of the slight casualty at the bridge over the Perquimans, he brought in his men and horses in good condition. He travelled over sixty miles, along the chain of the enemy's outposts, with a small force of one hundred and forty men, beyond the reach of support, and in constant danger of being cut off. The officers of the expedition, and who have received the commendation of the comma
has been ascertained, and the position and intentions of certain rebel forces made fully apparent. The expedition is almost unparalleled in military movements, considering the time consumed and the distance travelled. The march rivals that of Havelock in India, where two hundred miles were passed over in five days and a half; and which led to Havelock's promotion from a captaincy to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Col. Dodge travelled one hundred and sixty-eight miles in four days, over corduroy roaHavelock's promotion from a captaincy to a lieutenant-colonelcy. Col. Dodge travelled one hundred and sixty-eight miles in four days, over corduroy roads, through the Dismal Swamp, where in some places the water was breast-high to the horses, and with the exception of the slight casualty at the bridge over the Perquimans, he brought in his men and horses in good condition. He travelled over sixty miles, along the chain of the enemy's outposts, with a small force of one hundred and forty men, beyond the reach of support, and in constant danger of being cut off. The officers of the expedition, and who have received the commendation of the comma