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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
artillery, Crutchfield, also dangerously wounded, and each seemed more concerned about the other's injuries than his own. Here Jackson's left arm was amputated two inches below the shoulder, and three days afterward he was taken to the Chandler House, near Guinea Station, on the railroad from Fredericksburg to Richmond, where he died on the following Sunday. Order A. P. Hill to prepare for action, he cried in the delirium just before death. Pass the infantry to the front rapidly. Tell Major Hawkes-- He stopped, and then with a feeling of relief he said: Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees. The sword which carved his name upon the shield of fame had returned forever to its scabbard. His wish was fulfilled. I have always desired to die on Sunday, he had said. When Lee received a notification of his being wounded he wrote to Jackson that, could he have directed the course of events, he would have chosen for the good of his country to have been disabl
all went: Come and get your quinine, quinine, quinine; come and get your quinine—quii-ni-ine! The Seventy-second New York took part in the battle of Gettysburg in July, 1863, and in the pursuit of Lee, and did duty along the line of the Rappahannock till October of that year. Its wounded were many, and the surgeons' duties were exacting during battle and for days thereafter. An army doctor in the field C. K. Irwine, surgeon of the seventy-second New York infantry September, 1863 Surgeon Hawkes, fiftieth New York engineers cotton-warehouse near the river, commodious, thoroughly clean, and well arranged in every way. The had here about two hundred and fifty patients, mostly chronic cases, two assistant surgeons, a hospital steward, a one-armed hospital clerk, about twenty convalescents as nurses, and a matron—the wife of one of the assistant surgeons. After the battle of Chickamauga, to revert to an earlier period of the war, the Confederate wounded were treated for weeks
all went: Come and get your quinine, quinine, quinine; come and get your quinine—quii-ni-ine! The Seventy-second New York took part in the battle of Gettysburg in July, 1863, and in the pursuit of Lee, and did duty along the line of the Rappahannock till October of that year. Its wounded were many, and the surgeons' duties were exacting during battle and for days thereafter. An army doctor in the field C. K. Irwine, surgeon of the seventy-second New York infantry September, 1863 Surgeon Hawkes, fiftieth New York engineers cotton-warehouse near the river, commodious, thoroughly clean, and well arranged in every way. The had here about two hundred and fifty patients, mostly chronic cases, two assistant surgeons, a hospital steward, a one-armed hospital clerk, about twenty convalescents as nurses, and a matron—the wife of one of the assistant surgeons. After the battle of Chickamauga, to revert to an earlier period of the war, the Confederate wounded were treated for weeks
distiller. Among the processes for the expedition or more perfect performance of the change of condition may be cited: — Riley, March 5, 1850, converts corn meal into glucose under pressure in a boiling solution of sulphuric acid: water, 1,000 gallons; acid, 25 pounds. Reitsch, February 3, 1852. The saccharine matter of wort evaporated to a viscid mass. Hoffman, May 25, 1858. Meal treated with dilute sulphuric acid and steam under pressure of 350° Fah. Decant and evaporate. Hawkes, February 3, 1863. Wort of malt boiled with decoction of hops; cane-sugar added; boiled to a thick sirup; add gelatine, and can. Weiderfeld, April 28, 1863. Meal steeped in water impregnated with gases resulting from dry distillation of sulphuric acid; wood charcoal; crystallized soda. Goessling, May 10, 1864. Corn soaked, bruised between rollers; soaked in repeated waters, to prevent fermentation. Knead, pass through sieve, wash; treat with caustic potash, then with acid and steam
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Dissenting Academics. (search)
s, from whose very brief prefatory notice of the author the preceding particulars have been derived. The sermons shew him to have been an Arian of the same school with Peirce, Chandler, and other liberal divines among the Presbyterians of the earlier part of the last century; and they are productions not unworthy to be ascribed to one whose chief study was that of the Holy Scripts tures of the Old and New Testament; for which he was eminently qualified by a penetrating understanding, critical skill in the learned languages, and a good acquaintance with history and antiquity. Besides Mr. Willets, Messrs. Hawkes and Blyth, of Birmingham, Fownes of Shrews. bury, Turner of Wakefield, Bond of Stand, White of Derby, Harrrison of Lancaster, Moore of Abingdon, and Ward of Yeovil, are known to have been pupils of Dr. Latham. All these, and doubtless many others, adopted antitrinita-rian opinions as the result of the liberal and unfettered system on which their education had been conducted.
, 283. Hatteras,, U. S. S., VI., 294, 316. Hatteras Fort, N. C. (see also Fort Hatteras, N. C.), VI., 269. Hatteras Inlet, N. C., VI., 100, 104, 115, 125, 268, 269. Hatton, R., I., 364; X., 149. Haupt, H.: II., 125; V., 91, 275: working as foreman on the military railroad, V., 277, 278, 282, 284, 289, 294, 296. Havana, Cuba, V., 160; VI., 291. Harclock, C. S. VI., 119. Hawes, J. M., X., 267. Hawes shop, Va., III., 322; IV., 203, 247. Hawkes, surgeon Fiftieth N. Y. Inf., VII., 265. Hawks, W. J., X., 103. Hawk's Nest, Lookout Mountain, Tenn., VIII., 325. Hawk's Nest, W. Va. I., 350. Hawkins, R. C., II., 100; X., 225. Hawley, J. R., X., 197. Hawthorne, A. T., X., 259. Haxall's, Va., VI., 77. Haxall's Landing, Va.: IV., 126; VII., 345. Hayes, J., III., 204; VII., 45. Hayes, J. A., IX., 289. Hayes, R. B.: II. 29: III., 165, 322; IX., 30: X., 19, 96. Haynes' Bluff,
Doggett, Isaac, 1754. Floyd, Hugh, 1754, 1755, 1759, 1760, 1761, 1762, 1763, 1764, 1765, 1766, 1767, 1770, 1771, 1772. Floyd, Sarah, 1741, 1742, 1743, 1744, 1745, 1746, 1747, 1748. Francis, John, Jr., 1717, 1718, 1719, 1720, 1721, 1726. Francis, Capt. Thomas, 1783, 1784. Frost, Rufus, 1811. Goldthwait, Benjamin, 1760. Goldthwait, Charity, 1761. Hall, John, Jr., 1702, 1703, 1704, 1705, 1706. Hall, John, Sr., 1696, 1700, 1701. Hall, Stephen, 1697, 1698, 1699. Hawkes, Jonathan, 1755, 1756, 1757, 1758. Hills, Ebenezer, 1773. Hyde, James, 1818, 1819, 1820. Jaquith, Elizabeth, 1808, 1809. Jaquith, John, 1805, 1806. Jaquith, Moses, 1826, 1827. Johnson, Josiah, 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808, 1809, 1810. Jones, William, 1762, 1763, 1764, 1765, 1766, 1767. Kendall, Samuel, 1828, 1829, 1830, 1831. Kimball, John, 1754. King, Isaiah, 1820. Lathe, Francis, 1714. Lealand, Abner, 1758, 1759. Mayo, Seth, 1812, 1813, 1814, 1815, 1816, 18
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1860., [Electronic resource], English view of the late Royal visit. (search)
r Thos. H Flanagan T Fellow W H Finn Jno. A Fairfax Mark Fore L H Fisher-Rev Mr Garvey Mich'l Graser W Godwin Thos. Gordon S A Grimsley S W Gregory G Gibson Gee Goodyear J W Godsey Jas. M Garrett J A Gentry J R Gary A Giblin Jas. Guider Dan Green T R Hutzler Mority Hoben Rev W G 2 Harvey W M Hockey Wm. 2 Handy Rev J W Hopson Jno. Hutton Joel 2 Hawes J W 1 Heath J F Houry Jno. Hayne Dr T Howard S H Harris,Spencer & Harris Hawkes E A Hardy E H Holleran Pat 2 Henry C R Harman M G Harrison Benj. Howard B T Hunter (temperanee lecturer) Hardin Dr A C Hirsh A M Hopkins-- Ingraham A Irby W D Jenkins W F Jones W Jones H T Jenness G O Johnson F T Johnson F Jones W H Jackson W F Johnson J S Jones J T Keane Jno. Kennedy J C G Lamb C L Lee C C Lyneman A H Lucado L F Lunsford L E Leigh W R Lane T Loving Gen. W S Larfarguer M Lafond F H Lockwood G W Lucas G
indefatigable in his labors to help and ameliorate the condition of the army, so is Dr. Muscroff, of the Tenth.--Nothing is left undone by these men. Dr. Shumard, Brigade Surgeon of the First Brigade, has been unceasing in his efforts to do everything in his power toward helping and even rendering assistance to the sick and wounded. The only brigade in the whole division whose wants are promptly attended to is the First. Gen. Benham's. Himself and staff. Captains Stanage, Atkinson, and Hawkes, are untiring in their efforts. Major Burke, of the Tenth, to his credit be it said has the most healthy regiment, except the Fifth Ohio, that I have seen during my sojourn in Western Virginia. The day previous to our fall back on Mountain Cave towards Gauley, the Tenth struck tents at 6 P. M. and at 7½ the whole baggage and tents of the "Bloody Tenth" were on the move. At 8½ P.M. the same night, Gen. Benham received orders from Rosencranz to halt. Consequently, the men of the Tenth
; Col. Frank Skinner, 1st Va. regiment, and some of the Governor's Aids; the hearse containing the body, surmounted by raven plumes, and drawn by two white horses; the Staff of Gen. Jackson, including Major Pendleton, Adjutant General; Major W. I Hawkes, Chief Commissary of the Corps; Major D. B. Bridgford, Chief Provost; Capt. Douglas, Lieut. Smith, Aids-de Camp; Dr McGuire, Surgeon, and others; the members of the City Council, two abreast, and lastly, an immense host of citizens and strangers.rmed of the fact, and was offered stimulants to prolong his existence.--These he refused to take, and a short time after his mind commenced to wander. Among his last words was a reference to his men. He said, speaking of his Commissary: "Tell Maj. Hawkes to send forward provisions to the men." About 1 o'clock his wife entered the room, and took the last farewell which he bid on this earth, and at 15 minutes past 3 o'clock his spirit ascended to its Giver. Gen Lee's order after Gen, J