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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the Alstadt Grays. (search)
harge of Mahone's Division at the battle of the Crater. The membership of the company, as compiled, reads as follows: Captain, E. H. Flournoy; First Lieutenant, Charles Friend; Second Lieutenant, Samuel Flournoy; Third Lieutenant, David M. Goode; First Sergeant, Charles Fossey; Second Sergeant, Samuel Woodfin; Third Sergeant, J. W. Jones; Fourth Sergeant, George Woodfin; First Corporal, Cornelius Wilkinson; Second Corporal, Wesley Rudd; Third Corporal, Joseph Dorsett; Fourth Corporal, Calhoun Hawkins; Privates, J. H. Ashbrooke, W. B. Ashbrooke, Thomas Bailey, Joseph Bailey, James H. Bailey, John A. Bailey, William E. Bailey, Robert H. Bass, Joseph Bass, John Bass, Aaron H. Branch, Lucius Branch, Merritt Boatwrights. R. M. Cheatham, A. A. Cheatham, John F. Cheatham, William E. Cheatham, Julius C. Condrey, Lewis Dorsett, William Dorsett, A. A. Ellett, C. C. Ellett, Richard Ellett, Joseph Elam, Richard Elam,, Abner E. Fossey, David Fossey, Samuel Fossey, A. A. Ford, M. W. Ford, S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
p pieces of beef from, the frying-pan as they rushed by. The meat was so hot that they could hardly hold it. Curiously enough, on the lawn was also a man named Hawkins, who lived in the house across the road. Hawkins had carried some mail that morning over in the direction of the Rappahannock, and had been warned that the UnionHawkins had carried some mail that morning over in the direction of the Rappahannock, and had been warned that the Union army was in the neighborhood. In trying to get back home he was captured and made a prisoner in his house, where there were about twenty-five women and children who had fled there for shelter. His home was General Carl Schurz's headquarters. One of Schurz's staff officers, said Hawkins, as he placed a chew of tobacco in betweHawkins, as he placed a chew of tobacco in between his grizzled beard, came in the house, and, throwing down his sword, said he would go out and see the fun. He had heard some firing, and thought it was a skirmish. He never thought to get his sword. I had been in the Confederate army, had been discharged, but as I stood in the door of my house, my old company came rushing righ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
trust to baptism unaccompanied by works. Land and the unemployed were brought together on a business rather than a philanthropic basis; but like more modern agencies for profit, this too called itself philanthropism. Te deum for slave trade. The red man, by a mute appeal more eloquent than words, had said, give me liberty, or give me death. The answer came— we will give you death. The negro, who imposed on himself no such extreme alternative, took the place thus made vacant. When Hawkins made his voyage to the coast of Africa, there to collect a cargo of heathen raw material to be built into pious uses, Queen Elizabeth lent him her good ship Jesus, for the prosecution of his missionary zeal. One of the few features of the Peace of Utrecht which gave general satisfaction (Queen Ann went in person to communicate it to the peers) was that Assiento treaty whereby the right to supply Spanish colonies with negro slaves was transferred to England. A te deum composed by Handel wa