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of age, not physically incapable of doing military duty, are enlisted, and three-tenths of the whole are to be mustered into the field. The names are placed in one box, and as many numbers — from one to ten (repeated)--are placed in another box. When a name is drawn forth a number is also drawn; and if it be either No. 1, 2, or 3, the person is elected a soldier into the disunion army. Otherwise he escapes immediate service.--Washington Star, June 6. The Ninth Regiment N. Y. V., Colonel Hawkins, left Net York for Fortress Monroe.--(Doc. 235.) The Richmond Whig (Va.) of to-day announces that after to-day no passports will be issued to persons leaving the State, and no one will be admitted to the State except for reasons of peculiar force; also, that the Tennessee volunteers in Virginia are authorized to vote on the ordinance of the secession of Tennessee, although stationed in Virginia.--A Bank Convention, held at Atlanta, Ga., recommended that all the Southern banks, rail
The retreat of the National forces was conducted in a style worthy of veteran troops, and with as much coolness as if they were on a parade-ground, instead of the field of battle.--(Doc. 70.) About five o'clock this morning twenty-five of Hawkins' Zouaves encountered a rebel force, supposed to number about one hundred and fifty, including twenty-five cavalry, and one field-piece, seven miles from Newport News, Va.; three of the rebels were shot, and also six of Hawkins' Zouaves. The lath coolness as if they were on a parade-ground, instead of the field of battle.--(Doc. 70.) About five o'clock this morning twenty-five of Hawkins' Zouaves encountered a rebel force, supposed to number about one hundred and fifty, including twenty-five cavalry, and one field-piece, seven miles from Newport News, Va.; three of the rebels were shot, and also six of Hawkins' Zouaves. The latter sent for reinforcements, and five companies were sent to sustain them.--N. Y. Evening Post, July 6.
he illegal trade, and by whom they were taken prisoners and their vessels secured as prizes. They were loaded with salt and molasses. The Susan Jane was seen in the offing standing off and on suspiciously. Lieut. Crosby took the Fanny, with Col. Hawkins on board, and went out of the inlet to watch her movements. Apparently suspecting that something was out of joint, she stood off, when the Fanny pursued and gave her a shot at long range which did not have the effect to bring her to. At the suggestion of Colonel Hawkins, a secession flag was extemporized and let fly from the Fanny, in answer to which the schooner ran up the Palmetto flag of South Carolina, and at the same time tacked and came round. Soon after, however, seeming to smell a rat, she altered her course and stood off again, and tried to haul down her flag, but did not succeed, on account of its getting tangled. Perceiving that she was making off, Lieutenant Crosby let her have a shot across her bow, whereat she came
October 17. Brigadier-General William Nelson, by proclamation, called upon the people of Northeastern Kentucky, now in array against their National and State Governments, to return home, lay down their arms, and live in peace, promising to all such as shall do so a complete amnesty for what has passed. --(Doc. 93.) Major Gavitt's Indiana Cavalry, and five companies of infantry under Colonel Alexander of the Twenty-first Illinois regiment, having reinforced Captain Hawkins' party near Fredericton, Missouri, they attacked and completely routed the force of rebels in their vicinity. In apprehension of the approach of a larger force of rebels, the Union force at night fell back to Pilot Knob.--(Doc. 94.) Major Wright reached Lynn Creek, Missouri. On his march from Rolla he had three severe skirmishes with the enemy, upon whom he inflicted a considerable los.--Missouri Democrat, Oct. 20. Colonel Guthrie, in command of the National forces at Charleston, Western Virgi
November 17. This morning a detachment under Col. Alcorn stationed at Calhoun, attacked Hawkins' regiment at Cypress Bridge, three miles back of Rumsey, in McLean County, Ky., and completely routed the rebels, killing a great number, taking twenty-five prisoners, three hundred horses, and a number of guns, blankets, etc. The national loss was ten killed and fifteen wounded. A Panio prevailed at Charleston, which a week before the battle of Port Royal was regarded as absolutely impregnable. In explanation of the panic it is said: The entire fighting population of Charleston and Savannah as well as the intervening and adjacent country is on active duty. The exempts are very few in number, being confined to those who are engaged in expediting the preparations for the war, or are detained by other occupations which the public interest requires not to be suspended. Thus the community of Charleston and that of Savannah, alike shorn of the young and vigorous men, who give buoy
ed of the first and second launches, armed with howitzers, with forty men. Lieut. John G. Mitchell commanded the second launch. The other officers were Wm. Carter, gunner, and Acting Master's Mate Charles W. Adams. At three o'clock in the morning the yacht was boarded and captured after a sharp conflict, in which several of the rebels were killed, though some escaped. She was then set on fire, and her gun, a light thirty-two-pounder, was spiked, and before the boats regained the ship the yacht was entirely destroyed. A few stand of arms were captured, also thirteen prisoners, (three of them wounded,) and the yacht's colors. The officers engaged exhibited great coolness and courage. Henry Garcia, seaman, was killed; and John L. Emerson, coxswain, died of his wounds. Lieut. Jouett, and Win. Carter, gunner, were wounded; also five men, Edward Conway, Gunner's Mate; Geo. Bell, Coxswain; Hugh McGregor, Ordinary seaman; Francis Brown, seaman; and Charles Hawkins, seaman.--(Doc. 192.)
ween parties from the Twenty-third and Twenty-seventh Massachusetts regiments and the Second Battalion of the Wise Legion, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Frank Anderson, resulted in the utter repulse of the latter with heavy loss, including Captain Robert Coles, killed, and Capt. O. Jennings Wise, mortally wounded. During this engagement the two flanking columns approached the works. That on the right (General Parke's) passed the right of the central column, when the Ninth New Yorkers (Hawkins' Zouaves) were ordered to charge. Major Kimball headed the storming party, and with the peculiar cheer of the regiment, the men dashed forward. Almost at the same moment, General Reno, commanding the left column of attack, ordered the Fifty-first New Yorkers (Shepard Rifles) and the Twenty-first Massachusetts to charge the enemy on his right flank; and, almost at the same moment, the two storming parties appeared on the opposite flanks of the enemy's position. Without waiting for any
of a Georgia regiment, numbering eleven hundred men, a portion of Wise's Legion, and two batteries of artillery. The enemy was totally routed, with a loss of about sixty men. The National loss was about twelve killed and forty-eight wounded. Col. Hawkins, of the New York Zouaves, received a slight flesh-wound in the arm. The adjutant of Col. Hawkins's regiment was killed.--(Doc. 134.) General Banks at Newmarket, Va., sent the following to the War Department: To-day I have been to thCol. Hawkins's regiment was killed.--(Doc. 134.) General Banks at Newmarket, Va., sent the following to the War Department: To-day I have been to the bridges on the south fork of the Shenandoah, in the Massanutton valley, with a force of cavalry, infantry, and artillery, to protect the two important bridges that cross the river. We were within sight of Luray, at the south bridge. A sharp skirmish occurred with the rebels, in which they lost several men taken prisoners. Their object was the destruction of the bridges. One of the prisoners left the camp on the bank of the Rappahannock Tuesday morning. There were no fortifications there up
lutions were unanimously passed, pledging the State to furnish her full quota of soldiers under the call of President Lincoln. Public meetings were held in England, praying the government to use its influence to bring about a reconciliation between the Northern and Southern States of America, as it was from America alone that an immediate supply of cotton could be expected; and if need there should be, that the British government should not hesitate to acknowledge the independence of the Southern States. A fight occurred near Tompkinsville, Ky., between a body of one thousand five hundred guerrillas, under Morgan, and the Third battalion of Pennsylvania cavalry, numbering about two hundred and fifty men, under the command of Major Jordan, in which the Nationals were routed, with a loss of four killed, six wounded, and nineteen taken prisoners. Hamilton, N. C., was occupied by the National forces under the command of Capt. Hammel, of Hawkins's N. Y. Zouaves.--(Doc. 148.)
of that territory, issued a proclamation calling upon the citizens of the organized counties of the territory to enroll themselves in accordance with previous instructions, and that all organized companies should meet as often as practicable to perfect themselves in drill, that they might be prepared for any emergency. The chiefs of the Wisconsin Chippewa Indians, Naw-gaw-nub and Shin-gwack, sent a letter to Gov. Ramsey of Minnesota, offering their services in putting down the hostile Sioux Indians, who had risen against the whites in the frontier settlements of the latter State. A fight took place near Plymouth, N. C., between a force of Union troops under Orderly Sergeant Green of Hawkins's Zouaves, aided by a portion of the inhabitants of Plymouth, and a large force of rebels under the command of Col. Garrett, resulting in a rout of the latter with a loss of thirty killed and forty taken prisoners, among whom were Colonel Garrett and several of his officers.--(Doc. 201.)
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