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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
d Harry West; Engineers: Second-Assistant, Clark Fisher; Third-Assistants, W. L. Nicoll, James Long and H. W. Bulkley. Steamer water Witch. Lieutenant-Commander, Austin Pendergrast; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Pierson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, L. G. Billings; Acting-Masters. C. W. Buck and H. S. Kimball; Acting-Ensign, J. M. Forsyth; Acting-Masters' Mates, J. J. Bigley and E. D. Parsons; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant Samuel Genther; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. P. Cooper, John Hawkins and John Overn. Steamer Commodore McDonough. Lieutenant-Commander, George Bacon; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. W. Gibson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. F. Quintard; Acting-Ensigns, Wm. Knapp and J. A. Buxton; Acting-Master's Mates, J. K. Winn, J. W. Goodwin and D. B. Hallett; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, T. O. Reynolds, J. T. Booth and S. S. Hetrick. Steamer Isaac Smith. Acting-Lieutenant, F. S. Conover; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. H. Marvin; Acting-Assistant-Paymaster
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
ard Carter; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, G. H. Guyer; Acting-Third-Assistants, Edwin Vaughan and W. L. McKay. Steamer Stettin. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, C. J. Van Alstine; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, C. J. Pigott; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. M. Burns, Jr.; Acting-Master, J. M. Butler; Acting-Ensigns, G. R. Bailey, C. B. Pray and J. C. Staples; Acting-Master's Mates, Benj. Russell and C. H. Fernald; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, J. B. Edwards; Acting-Third-Assistant, John Hawkins, John Ryan and Anthony Gale. Steamer Iris. Acting-Master, Wm. Barrymore; Acting-Master's Mates, W. W. Brandt, A. H. L. Bowie and Thomas Irving; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Thos. Fewkes; Acting-Third-Assistants, Morris McCarty and Dennis Lyng. Steamer Philadelphia. Acting-Master, Geo. R. Durand; Assistant Surgeon, J. H. Culver; Assistant Paymaster, H. L. Wait; Acting-Ensigns, L. A. Waterman, J. E. Wallis and J. Worth; Acting-Master's Mates, Geo. H. Bartlett, C. F. Moore
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
. Wt. Parker; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistants, E. H. Keith and John Lardner; Acting-Third-Assistant, Jesse Wright; Gunner, Wm. Bartlett; Carpenter, Samuel N. Whitehouse. Stettin--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, C. J. Van Alstine; Acting-Master, J. M. Butler; Acting-Ensigns, C. B. Pray, J. C. Staples and Wm. Jenny; Acting-Master's Mate, Edward W. Mosier; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Robert Stone; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. M. Burnes; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, John Hawkins; Acting-Third-Assistants, Anthony Gale, J. W. Elliott and W. W. Smith. Memphis--Third rate Acting-Masters, R. O. Patterson and J. B. Childs; Acting-Ensigns, S. W. Cowing, B. D. Reed and G. C. Chamberlain; Acting-Master's Mate, John W. Moore; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Bates; Acting Assistant Paymaster, Wm. E. Foster; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistants, C. H. McCarty and Peter Anderson; Third-Assistant, S. C. McLanahan; Acting-Third-Assistant, Wm. Adams. Mary Sanford--Third-
mmerce for slaves between Africa and America. --Holmes's Annals of America, vol. i., p. 3.5. In 1563, the English began to import negroes into the West Indies. Their first slave-trade was opened the preceding year on the coast of Guinea. John Hawkins, in the prospect of a great gain, resolved to make trial of this nefarious and inhuman traffic. Communicating the design to several gentlemen in London, Who became liberal contributors and adventurers, three good ships were immediately provided; and, with these and one hundred men, Hawkins sailed to the coast of Guinea, where, by money, treachery, and force, he procured at least three hundred negroes, and now sold them at Hispaniola. --Ibid., p. 83. Ferdinand (in 1513) issued a decree declaring that the servitude of the Indians is warranted by the laws of God and man --Ibid., p.32. Every freeman of Carolina shall have absolute power and authority over his negro slaves, of what nation or religion whatsoever. --Locke's Fundamen
Territory, otherwise than in punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; provided always, that any person escaping into the same from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed, and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor, or service, as aforesaid. On passing the above Ordinance, the Yeas and Nays being required by Mr. Yates, they were taken, with the following result: Massachusetts Mr. Holton ay, Ay.   Mr. Dane ay, New York Mr. Smith ay, Ay.   Mr. Haring ay,   Mr. Yates no, New Jersey Mr. Clarke ay, Ay.   Mr. Sherman ay, Delaware Mr. Kearney ay, Ay.   Mr. Mitchell ay, Virginia Mr. Grayson ay, Ay.   Mr. R. H. Lee ay,   Mr. Carrington ay, North Carolina Mr. Blount ay, Ay.   Mr. Hawkins ay, South Carolina Mr. Kean ay, Ay.   Mr. Huger ay, Georgia Mr. Few ay, Ay.   Mr. Pierce ay, Journal of Congress, vol. IV
e, the existing discontents among the Southern people, and the growing hostility among them to the Federal Government, are greatly to be regretted; and that any reasonable, proper, and constitutional remedies, necessary to preserve the peace of the country and the perpetuation of the Union, should be promptly and cheerfully granted. Twenty-two votes were cast for this proposition, including those of all the members from Slave States who voted. Two (Messrs. Boyce, of South Carolina, and Hawkins, of Florida) were absent. Mr. Jefferson Davis was present, but did not vote. The Nays (eight) were all Republicans. On motion of Mr. Garnett B. Adrain (Douglas Democrat) of New Jersey, the House, December 17th. by 151 Yeas to 14: Nays: Resolved, That we deprecate the spirit of disobedience to the Constitution, wherever manifested; and that we earnestly recommend the repeal of all statutes by the State Legislatures in conflict with, and in violation of, that sacred instrument, an
the 21st, a spirited fight had occurred at Fredericktown, in the south-east, which section had hitherto been overrun almost at will by Rebel bands directed by Jeff. Thompson, one of Jackson's brigadiers, termed the Swamp Fox by his admirers. Capt. Hawkins, of the Missouri (Union) cavalry, having been ordered thither on a reconnoissance from Pilot Knob, on the north-east, engaged and occupied Thompson while Gen. Grant, commanding at Cape Girardeau, on the Mississippi, sent a superior force, under Col. Plummer, to strike him from the east. Meantime, Col. Carlile, with a, considerable body of infantry, moved up from Pilot Knob to support Hawkins. When all these advanced, the disparity in numbers was so great as to preclude a serious contest; so that Thompson, though strongly posted, was overpowered, and, after two hours fighting, constrained to fly, leaving 60 dead behind him, including Col. Lowe, his second in command. Thompson was hotly pursued for twenty miles, and his banditti t
quarters ran into the inlet as a Confederate shelter, and fell an easy prey to our arms. No effort being made by the Confederates to retake this important position, Gen. Butler, with most of our vessels, had departed on other service; when Col. Hawkins, commanding at Hatteras, dispatched, late in September, the 20th Indiana, Col. Brown, to the petty hamlet on the Hatteras Bank, known as Chicamicomico, near Cape Hatteras, and some fifteen or twenty miles north-east of the Inlet. The excuse fa detachment further down, intending to cut off his retreat and compel his surrender. Col. Brown, however, destroyed his tents and stores, and made a rapid march to the Hatteras Lighthouse, with a loss of about 50 stragglers taken prisoners. Col. Hawkins, by this time fully apprised of the Rebel movement, soon started, with six companies, to the rescue; while the Susquehanna and Monticello, our only two fighting vessels at the Inlet, moved up to the vicinity of the Lighthouse, to take a hand i
89. Harrison, Wa. Henry, 52-3; 154; 515. Hartford Convention, the, 85. Hatteras, bombardment of the forts at, 599; their capture, 600; 627. Hawes, Richard, of Ky., allusion to, 509; succeeds Johnson, as Provisional Governor, 617. Hawkins, Capt., at Fredericktown, Mo., 591. Hawkins, Col., (Union,) 600. Hawkins, Jn., the first English slave-trader, 28. Hayne, Col., sent to W. by Gov. Pickens, 412. Hayne, Robert Y., 86; 93. Hazelhurst, Isaac, speech at the PhiladelphHawkins, Jn., the first English slave-trader, 28. Hayne, Col., sent to W. by Gov. Pickens, 412. Hayne, Robert Y., 86; 93. Hazelhurst, Isaac, speech at the Philadelphia Peace meeting. 366. Hazlitt, with Brown, 298; is executed, 199. Heintzelman, Gen. S. P., wounded at Bull Run, 545; official report of the battle, 546; 551. Helper, Hinton R., 304. Hendricks, T. A., of Ind., beaten by Lane, 326. Henry, Alex., Mayor of Philadelphia; calls a Peace meeting, 362; his speech, 363; his prohibition of G. W. Curtis, 367; 406. Henry, Gustavus A., a Commissioner from Tennessee to the Confederacy, 482. Henry, Patrick, 33; 42; speech against consolid
s of the cavalry were also killed. The corpses of the two men who fell into the creek floated off with the tide, and Acting Brigadier-General Weber sent a detatchment off to pick them up, if possible, in order to have them decently interred. One of the bodies only was found, and in the centre of the forehead was a hole from a bullet, which evidently was the cause of the death of this poor man. In his pockets were found a number of letters, and by these we ascertained that his name was John Hawkins, Adjutant of the Alabama Minute Men. On his coat the buttons bore the letters A. M. M. About thirty dollars in shinplasters were also found on his body, and a small bag, slung about his neck, contained nineteen dollars in gold. The bills were on the banks of North Carolina and Virginia, and as low as ten cents in value. The enemy had retreated about three hundred paces, and having again taken up a position, commenced to pour a terrible fire upon Major Schnoepf's command, without, howeve
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