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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 18 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 18 16 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 2 2 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Hawks or search for Hawks in all documents.

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wait and watch and yearn For news of Stonewall's band. Ah, Widow! read, with eyes that burn, That ring upon thy hand. Ah, Wife! sew on, pray on, hope on; Thy life shall not be all forlorn; The foe had better ne'er been born That gets in ‘Stonewall's way.’ John Williamson Palmer. The dying words of Stonewall Jackson from Poems of Sidney Lanier; copyright, 1884, 1891, by Mary D. Lanier; published by Charles Scribner's sons. ‘Order A. P. Hill to prepare for battle.’ ‘Tell Major Hawks to advance the commissary train.’ ‘Let us cross the river and rest in the shade.’ the remarkable feature of this elegy is the spirit of resignation that pervades it. No strain of bitterness can be discovered, though it was written in September of 1865, while the young poet, who had lost his health in prison the winter before, was residing in Georgia. Lanier was later one of the first Southerers to express the sentiment of nationality. The stars of Night contain the glitteri