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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 100 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 100 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 44 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 20 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 18 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge. You can also browse the collection for Nathaniel Hawthorne or search for Nathaniel Hawthorne in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 1: old Cambridge (search)
and not a trace of jealousy. They may have been called a Mutual Admiration Society, but this was incomparably better than to belong to one of those societies for Mutual Defamation which literary history has much oftener seen. Even Concord, in spite of its soothing name, did not always exhibit among its literary men that relation of unbroken harmony which marked the three most eminent of those here classed as Cambridge authors. It is well known that Emerson distrusted the sombre tone of Hawthorne's writings and advised young people not to read them; and that Judge Hoar, Emerson's inseparable friend, could conceive of no reason why any one should wish to see Thoreau's Journals published. Among the Knickerbocker circles in New York it seems to have been still worse, Cooper the novelist, says Parke Godwin, always brought a breeze of quarrel with him. Cooper wrote thus to Rufus W. Griswold (August 7, 1842): A published eulogy of myself from Irving's pen could not change my opinion o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 4: Longfellow (search)
old pine woods, on whose intersecting paths it is easy at this day for the fancy to represent Hawthorne and Longfellow as coming and going; and in having also, not far off, the wild and hilly region described in Hawthorne's Fanshawe. Bowdoin College cherishes with affection its few memorials of Longfellow, yet I found none of these more noticeable on a recent visit than the printed list of sn only twenty years old, contributed to literature, out of its undergraduates, Longfellow and Hawthorne, then spelled Hathorne; to public life, Franklin Pierce, President of the United States; to ththe White Mountains, and of Acadie. His mind thus seems to have worked curiously in line with Hawthorne as to themes; and this, like his selection of a theme for his Commencement Oration, shows thatuches, as where, for instance, Longfellow speaks of The old dull pain that runs through all of Hawthorne's writings, or describes Captain — as a fresh-ooking, mellow, drum-voiced Englishman, and adds
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 5: Lowell (search)
make it. I am very glad you have undertaken the editorship of the volumes, because it insures a good tone. If others should fail you, I will do Charley, but for other reasons than those I mentioned I think it better not. I read your article in the Review with much satisfaction. A light touch is so rare! I growled a little over what you say of Abbott [author of the Rollo Books], who is my Ogre, whose business it is to eat fairy-children. I was surprised that you did not speak of Hawthorne's childrenbooks. To me they are full of charm. I hear you [are] to come hither a lecturing. If so, there is a bed here which will welcome you warmly. Yours truly always, J. R. Lowelle. He could have certainly written nothing more charming in reference to his three lost nephews than when he described, at the beginning of his essay On a certain Condescension in foreigners, his walks from Elmwood to Harvard Square about 1870: The war was ended. I might walk townward without that
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
, Prof., Convers, 17. Fuller, Margaret, (Countess Ossoli), 22, 25, 26, 36, 47, 54, 55, 57, 58, 60, 119, 129, 150, 174, Gage, Gen., 21. Garfield, Pres. J. A., 182. Garrison, W. L., 85, 104, 179. Glover, Rev., Joseph, 5. Glover, Widow, 6. Godwin, Parke, 35, 67. Goethe, J. W., 63, 116. Goldsmith, Oliver, 11, 95. Goodale, Prof. G. L., 12. Granville, Lord, 192. Green, Samuel, 6. Greenwood, Isaac, 13. Griswold, R. W., 35, 160. Hale, Rev. Dr. E. E., 156. Hancock, John, 20. Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 34, 112, 113, 119, 135, 170. Hayes, Pres. R. B., 181. Hedge, Rev. Dr. F. H., 17, 25, 26, 54, 57, 59, 60, 63, 113. Hedge, J. D., 23, 24. Hedge, Prof., Levi, 14, 22, 23. Heth, Joyce, 97. Higginson, S. T., 153. Higginson, T. W., 70, 76, 81, 179, 180, 182, 183. Hildreth, Richard, 67. Hillard, G. S., 123, 128. Hoar, E. R., 34. Holmes, Rev., Abiel, 15, 75. Holmes, John, 15, 30, 166. Holmes, Mrs., Mary Jane, 98. Holmes, O. W., 11, 15, 21, 23, 24, 26, 32, 33, 36, 37, 38, 53,