Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Hay or search for Hay in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
es, juvenile in face and negligent in dress. W. S. Thayer in the New York Evening Post, May 23, Aug. 2, 1856; Jan. 30, 1857. Toombs's testimony, Congressional Globe, p. 1356. Toombs testified that he was an inch taller than Sumner. At his death he required a coffin six feet and four inches in length, and he was described by the undertaker as the largest framed and largest man who ever died in Washington. New York Evening Post, Jan. 29, 1857. A portrait of Brooks is given in Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, Century Magazine, June, 1887, p. 206. Of courage Brooks had given no proof. During the Mexican War, he raised a company of volunteers, but did no fighting. He went to Vera Cruz, but being taken ill returned home; and when he had recovered he rejoined his company in Mexico after the capture of the city. Butler said in a speech in June, 1856 (Congressional Globe, App. p. 631) that a sword was awarded Brooks for service in the Mexican War; but this is not stated in the eu
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
tions for secession and armed revolt. As to the military preparations at the South, see speeches of Miles in the House, Jan. 6, 1860; Van Wyck, March 7; and Mason in the Senate, March 1. Von Hoist, vol. VII. pp. 111-114, 366 note. Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. II. pp. 300, 333. Another and more eventful period was at hand. The new Capitol, with its ampler dome, and its extended wings covering the representatives of States and people, prefigured by no mean symbol the countryhad hardly a more friendly reception. As to the military preparations at the South, see speeches of Miles in the House, Jan. 6, 1860; Van Wyck, March 7; and Mason in the Senate, March 1. Von Hoist, vol. VII. pp. 111-114, 366 note. Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. II. pp. 300, 333. The bitterness of the two sections had increased since Sumner's last participation in the business of the Senate. Their recognition of each other was no longer social, but only formal and official. The