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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for Samuel Haycraft or search for Samuel Haycraft in all documents.

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er that after his nomination for the Presidency Mr. Lincoln received from Kentucky many inquiries about his family and origin. This curiosity on the part of the people in one who had attained such prominence was perfectly natural, but it never pleased him in the least; in fact, to one man who was endeavoring to establish a relationship through the Hanks family he simply answered, You are mistaken about my mother, without explaining the mistake or making further mention of the matter. Samuel Haycraft, the clerk of the court in Hardin county, invited him to visit the scenes of his birth and boyhood, which led him to say this in a letter, June 4, 1860: Unpublished Ms. You suggest that a visit to the place of my nativity might be pleasant to me. Indeed it would, but would it be safe? Would not the people lynch me? That reports reflecting on his origin and descent should arise in a community in which he felt that his life was unsafe is by no means surprising. Abraham Lincoln, R
e little acts of kindness, observes my informant, in an enthusiastic statement made in 1865, so impressed his mind that I made a steadfast friend in a man whose power and influence have since been felt throughout the world. A school-mate Samuel Haycraft, December 6, 1866. of Lincoln's at Hazel's school, speaking of the master, says: He perhaps could teach spelling and reading and indifferent writing, and possibly could cipher to the rule of three; but he had no other qualification of a teac that she had rejected him for the hand of the more fortunate Johnston. However that may have been, it is certain that he began his campaign in earnest this time, and after a brief siege won her heart. He made a very short courtship, wrote Samuel Haycraft Clerk of the Court. to me in a letter, December 7, 1866. He came to see her on the first day of December, 1819, and in a straightforward manner told her that they had known each other from childhood. Miss Johnston, said he, I have no wif
ned to such a course as would in fact embitter their feelings you can better Judge by my published speeches than by anything I would say in a short letter if I were inclined now, as I am not, to define my position anew. [From a letter to Samuel Haycraft, dated, Springfield, Ill., June 4, 1860.] Like yourself I belonged to the old Whig party from its origin to its close. I never belonged to the American party organization, nor ever to a party called a Union party; though I hope I neither am or ever have been less devoted to the Union than yourself or any other patriotic man. [Private and Confidential.] Springfield, Ill., Nov. 13, 1860. Hon. Samuel Haycraft. My Dear Sir:--Yours of the 9th is just received. I can only answer briefly. Rest fully assured that the good people of the South who will put themselves in the same temper and mood towards me which you do will find no cause to complain of me. Yours very truly, A. Lincoln. At Pittsburg he advised delibe