hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 42 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 72 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
Literary notices. Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne — complete edition — with numerous illustrations. Boston: D. Lothrop & Co. We have received from the Publishers this superb specimen of the Book-maker's art, of which, (reserving a full review for a future number) we can only say now that it presents the sweet poems of our Southern bard in most attractive form and we really know of no more appropiate gift book for the approaching holidays than this beautiful volume which is sold for $4, $5, $7, or $10 according to binding. Agents are wanted everywhere. The century and St. Nicholas lose none of their attractions as the months and years go on. The former maintains its well earned reputation as a really first class family Magazine, and as for St. Nicholas we would leave it to any intelligent boy or girl in the land, who has had the privilege of reading it to say if there is anything in this country or in Europe at all comparable to it. Our boys pronounce the December (Christmas
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 5: the New England period — Preliminary (search)
duct, a tendency toward reform which deeply affected our national history; and meantime it developed the most mature school of pure letters which has yet appeared in this country. Wendell's Literary history of America, p. 245. Period of transition. The period at which Boston began to assert itself as a literary centre which in some sense rivaled New York may be set, perhaps, at the year (1830) when Webster and Channing were at the height of their reputation; when Webster's Reply to Hayne was delivered, and Channing was just entering upon that career of social and political reform which gave him both American and European fame. Boston was then a little city of some sixty thousand inhabitants, still a small peninsula hemmed in by creeks and mud banks, without water pipes or gas, but with plenty of foreign commerce and activity of brain. The area of the peninsula was then 783 acres; it is now 1829 acres. There was no Back Bay in the present sense, but it was all a literal ba
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 8: the Southern influence---Whitman (search)
, but not a great picture, of Southern life and manners. Hayne and Timrod. Simms was born, and lived for most of his liharleston, which was also the native city of the two poets, Hayne and Timrod, who, apart from Lanier and Poe, are now best known among Southern poets. Paul Hamilton Hayne's poetry is neither markedly Southern nor markedly original. It has a certaina poet who cannot help singing. The verse of Henry Timrod, Hayne's contemporary and friend, is far more rugged, more charactscriptive passages there is a certain sweep and vigor which Hayne's style altogether lacks:-- Through lands which look oneapplauded, in the North during the same period. Timrod and Hayne, like Simms,--who also produced some creditable verse,--shauthern-born poets of this country except Lanier, even as to Hayne and Timrod, the question still remains whether they got acttion singer. The volume of his poetry is less than that of Hayne, but its wealth and depth are greater. Having spent so muc
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
and Dr. Grimshawe's secret. His American and English notebooks and French and Italian note-books were posthumously edited by his wife. During this time he occupied several government positions. Died at Plymouth, N. H., May 18, 1864. Hayne, Paul Hamilton Born in Charleston, S. C., Jan. 1, 1830. He graduated at the College of South Carolina and studied law, but gave up legal practice for literature, and was the editor of Russell's magazine and the Charleston Literary Gazette, contributime of Sherman's march to the sea, and, overcome by poverty and ill-health, he died at Columbia, S. C., Oct. 6, 1867. A volume of his poems appeared in 1860, and in 1873 The poems of Henry Timrod, edited, with a sketch of the poet's life, by Paul H. Hayne. Trumbull, John Born in Westbury (now Watertown), Conn., April 24, 1750. Graduating from Yale in 1767, he became tutor there and then studied law. His published works include The progress of Dulness (1772-74) ; an Elegy on the times (1
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
ters series, 1902. W. M. Baskervill's Life of Sidney Lanier, in Southern writers series, Barber & Smith (Nashville), 1897. G. E. Woodberry's Poe, in American men of letters series, 1885. John Burroughs's Study of Walt Whitman, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1896. H. Ellis's The New spirit, Walter Scott (London), 1890. (B) W. G. Simms's Poems, 2 vols., Redfield (New York), 1853. W. G. Simms's Novels, 18 vols., Redfield (New York), 1884-1886. H. B. Timrod's Poems, 1860. P. H. Hayne's Poems, D. Lothrop & Co., 1882. Sidney Lanier's Poems, Charles Scribner, 1884. Walt Whitman's Leaves of grass, 1855. Walt Whitman's Complete prose works, 1898. Chapter 9: the Western influence (A) This period is too recent to possess authorities. There is an excellent chapter in Wendell's Literary history. (B) C. F. Browne's (Artemus Ward) Complete works, Dillingham & Co., 1898. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. are the American publishers of Bret Harte's Complete wor
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
ock, John, 48. Harper's magazine, 132. Harte, Bret, 172, 236, 245, 246, 253, 273. Hartford wits, 38. Harvard College, 125, 140, 147, 202. Hathorne, John, 267. Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 90, 118, 139, 177, 182-191, 207. Hay, John, 264. Hayne, Paul Hamilton, 204, 205, 206. Hazlitt, William, 251. Henry, Patrick, 43. Hiawatha, Longfellow's, 142, 144, 264. Higginson, Stephen, 49. Higginson, Thacher, 160. Hildreth, Richard, 117. Historians, New England, 116-119. History of the Jews, 29. Merry wives of Windsor, 1. .Metamonphoses, Ovid's, Sandys's translation of, 8, 9. Midnight Mass for the dying year, Longfellow's, 210. Milton, 15, 35, 165, 277. Mitchell, Rev., John, 269. Mitchell, Dr., S. Weir, 155. Mocking bird, Hayne's, 204. Montagu, Lady, Mary, 13. Monthly magazine and American Review, 70. Morris, G. P., 105. Morris, William, 220. Mosses from an old Manse, Hawthorne's, 185. Mother Goose, 220, 224. Motley, John Lothrop, 87, 91, 118, 156. Moulton
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
Some years later Margaret J. Preston wrote to Hayne: Poetry has been only my pastime, not the the Confederacy. Of the younger poets Paul Hamilton Hayne, Henry Timrod, and James Ryder Randall enry Timrod (1829-67), the friend of Simms and Hayne, had also definitely dedicated himself to the poems each by Randall and Ticknor, one each by Hayne, Hope, Flash, Meek, Pike, Simms, and J. R. Thoaphical sketches, and bibliographies of Simms, Hayne, Mrs. Preston, Flash, and Randall, and surprisdition of Timrod (1873), of Ticknor (1879), of Hayne (1882), he finds a much larger number of Southfer, Ticknor's poem on Albert Sidney Johnston, Hayne's The Swamp Fox—a spirited characterization ofings the rapturous joy of the victory. Paul Hamilton Hayne sang a nobler song of victory, giving tived for many years in the Far West. Paul Hamilton Hayne alone made progress after the war. WithI Fain Would Linger Yet, and In Harbor. While Hayne did not strike a deeply original note, he cult[7 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
busy. He did indeed write a few humorous dialect poems, published in various local papers, but in general his resignation was that expressed in a letter to Paul Hamilton Hayne in 1870: I've not put pen to paper, in the literary way, for a long time. How I thirst to do so, how I long to sing a thousand various songs that oppren I have mirrored Mr. Field-lark's pretty eloquence so that I doubt he would know the difference betwixt the flute and his own voice. In the summer he confessed to Hayne: Are you, by the way, a musician? Strange, that I have never before asked this question,—when so much of my own life consists of music. I don't know that I'vis soul before he committed them to paper. He was, on the other hand, forever haunted by ideas for poems. As an obscure lawyer in Georgia he complained to Paul Hamilton Hayne of the thousand various songs that oppress me, unsung. Even after he had won the ear of the nation, he wrote to Gibson Peacock: I'm taken with a poem p
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
360, 362, 363, 365, 377-381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 387, 388, 389, 391, 394 Harvard, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, 33, 34, 35, 36, 77, 109, 110, 111, 115, 117, 123, 124, 126, 132, 133, 149, 207, 209, 226, 227, 246, 255, 316, 320 Haunted Palace, the, 65, 66, 67 d'haussonville, Count, 127, 129 Hawthorne (Hathorne), John, 21 Hawthorne (Hathorne), Nathaniel, 16-31, 33, 38, 63, 64, 67, 165, 168, 173, 202, 232, 249, 362, 369, 369 n., 370, 371, 373, 377, 383, 384, 387, 388, 401, 406, 408 Hayne, Paul Hamilton, 93 n., 288, 291, 292-293, 298, 301, 302, 303, 306, 307, 308, 311, 335, 336, 342 Hayne, Robert Y., 85 Hazard, Ebenezer, 106, 107, 113-114, 115 Hazlitt, William, 206, 258 Health, a, 289 Hearne (directory), 264 n. Heart of the War, the, 280 Heartsease and Rue, 247 Heeren, A. H. L., 112 Hegel, 209, 212, 213 Heidelberg, 34 Heine, 243 von Held, Toni, 357 n. Hemans, Mrs., 398 Henneman, John Bell, 318 Henty, G. A., 404 Herald (N. Y.), 155, 186, 187, 193,