Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hayne or search for Hayne in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The case of the <rs>South</rs> against the <rs>North</rs>. [from New Orleans Picayune, December 30th, 1900.] (search)
e discussion of the doctrine, or theory, of nullification, was begun by some southern members of Congress, notably by Senator Hayne, of South Carolina, in January, 1830. Senator Hayne asserted the right of a state to interpose and arrest the executiSenator Hayne asserted the right of a state to interpose and arrest the execution of any federal measure oppressive to its citizens and violative of the Constitution, and as a last resort to retire from the union. Mr. Grady observes that this was an unfortunate move, aside from any merit in it; it united against those who held Mr. Hayne's opinions many of the honest and sincere friends of the union and all those who were, or hoped to be, beneficiaries of Federal legislation. Naturally, a champion of the union was sought for; and he was found in Daniel Webster, whose reply to Hayne added very much to his fame, was regarded as a coup de grace to States' rights, and became as familiar as Mother Goose's Melodies in every section of the union. Mr. Webster delivered two speeches in the course of the debate, one on Jan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of the history Committee of the Grand Camp C. V., Department of Virginia. (search)
ster. Daniel Webster (the great expounder of the Constitution, as he is called), notwithstanding his famous reply to Mr. Hayne, delivered in 1830, in which he so ingeniously denied the right of a State to determine for itself when its constitutio Union was the same as that which the counties bear to the States of which they respectively form a part? His reply to Hayne. Those who deny the right of secession are fond of quoting as their authority extracts from Mr. Webster's reply to Mr.Mr. Hayne, made in 1830. It is worthy of note that the Capon Springs and Buffalo speeches were made in 1851; and these last are the product of his riper thinking—his profounder reflections. He had evidently learned much about the Constitution in the his time one of the distinguished senators from Massachusetts, uses this language in speaking of Mr. Webster's reply to Mr. Hayne. He says: The weak places in his (Webster's) armor were historical in their nature. It was probably necessary (at