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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
. W. G. Ogier, E. B. Colhoun and Capt. T. B. Hayne respectively, officers of Companies A, B and C, of Lucas' command. In the same way, lower down the Stono, at Battery island, Maj. J. W. Brown, Second artillery, concealed two rifled 24-pounders in the woods, at night, built platforms for them in the old battery, and kept in hiding for the event. Brown's guns were commanded by Lieuts. John A. Bellinger, Company B, and F. Lake, Company K. Fifty men of the Eighth Georgia battalion, under Lieuts. R. Hays and George Johnson, were detailed as sharpshooters. Lieut.--Col. Joseph A. Yates, First regulars, made a secret disposition of a larger force, on John's island, between the guns of Gary and Brown. He took two companies of Major Alston's siege train, A and B, commanded by Capt. B. C. Webb and Lieut. S. W. Willson, Jr.; Company F, Palmetto battalion, Capt. F. C. Schulz; a light battery, commanded by Capt. F. H. Harleston; one Parrott gun, in charge of Lieut. T. E. Gregg; Capt. John C. M
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
ent, were not given the plan of the commanding general. Edward Johnson's three brigades did not begin the actual attack on Culp's hill until dusk, according to his own and General Ewell's statements. General Early, with two of his four brigades, Hays' and Hoke's, attacked Cemetery hill still later. These two brigades carried the height and actually took the enemy's batteries, but were unable without support to hold what they had gained. It is in the report of Rodes, who did not advance at altry to reinforce against the attack then in progress on the Confederate right. The troops of the Federal army in position at Culp's and Cemetery hills were those beaten and routed on the 1st, and considering the success gained by the brigades of Hays and Avery, there can be no reasonable doubt that with the immediate support of Rodes, the attack being made at the earlier hour ordered, Cemetery hill would have fallen, and with its fall the Confederate left and center would have driven the Feder
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
included in the sketch of that regiment. The Eighth battalion Georgia infantry had at its organization the following officers: Lieut.-Col. J. T. Reid, Maj. B. F. Hunt, Asst. Quartermaster H. S. Cranford, Adjt. J. W. Gray, Capts. (A) H. M. Lumpkin, (B) M. Y. Sexton, (C) William Holsonback, (D) Z. L. Walters, (E) John A. Hopper, (F) L. N. Jackson, (G) T. J. Paxton. The battalion served in 1862 in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Fifty men of the battalion under Lieuts. R. Hays and George Johnson were engaged in an affair on Stono river near Charleston, in which a Federal gunboat which had ventured past the Confederate batteries was cut off and forced to surrender. In May, 1863, the battalion went with Gist's brigade to Jackson, Miss., to reinforce Gen. J. E. Johnston, who was gathering an army with which to attempt the relief of Vicksburg. After the campaign in north Mississippi, the battalion participated in the campaigns of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
and Twenty-first North Carolina, and concentrating their fire and that of the Twelfth Georgia upon a part of the enemy's line in front of the latter, succeeded in breaking it; and as a brigade of fresh troops came up to the support of Lawton's and Hays' brigades just at this time, Walker ordered an advance, but the brigade which came up having fallen back, he was compelled to halt, and finally to fall back to his first position. His brigade (Trimble's) had suffered terribly. . . . Colonel Douglbrigades had been engaged, and the steadiness with which they maintained their position, are shown by the losses they sustained. Lawton's brigade suffered a loss of 554 killed and wounded out of 1, 500, and five regimental commanders out of six. Hays' and Walker's brigades, together hardly equal in numbers to Lawton's, suffered the same loss, including all of the regimental commanders but one. In the death of Colonel Douglass, said Early, the country sustained a serious loss. He was talented,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
arye's hill. The first attack was repulsed, but a second one carried the trenches, capturing a large part of the Eighteenth Mississippi and part of the Twenty-first, besides a company of the Washington artillery with its guns. Early, hastening up with his division, checked the progress of the enemy. The next morning General Early attacked Sedgwick in the rear, while McLaws and Anderson attacked in front. Early's attack began before that of McLaws and Anderson. As the brigades of Hoke and Hays crossed Hazel run to move toward the right, Gordon's brigade advanced toward Lee's and Marye's hills, followed by Smith and Barksdale. Col. C. A. Evans, of the Thirty-first Georgia, was in the lead in this attack of Gordon's brigade, recapturing Marye's hill and holding it, and subsequently, aided by the rest of the division, Gordon compelled the enemy to give up the only advantage he had gained in the three days batties. The loss of the brigade in killed and wounded was 161, including amo
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
tle of that day was desperate, each side holding its ground. The Georgians of Doles' and Gordon's brigades were the first to win success, regaining the ground lost upon the first Federal attack; Gordon, by a dashing charge, capturing several hundred prisoners and relieving Doles, who though hard pressed had held his ground. On the 6th of May it was upon the suggestion of Gordon that the attack was made upon the Federal right, and his brigade, supported by Johnston's North Carolinians and Hays' Louisianians, charged with such vehemence as to take a mile of the Federal works, and capture 600 prisoners, including Generals Seymour and Shaler. General Ewell in his report says that General Gordon sent word to him by General Early at 9 o'clock that morning, urging this very attack. Early did not think it safe, and Ewell did not order it until he had examined the ground himself. As soon as he had examined the ground, he ordered Gordon to make the attack; but it was then nearly sunset.