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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
iana, (Napier Bartlett, Esq.,) in the account of this rout, he says: Hays had received orders through Early from General Ewell (though Lee's ge no further in case he should succeed in capturing that place. But Hays now saw that the enemy were coming around by what is known as the Baet them at the time referred to, was a matter of vital importance. Hays recognized it as such and presently sent for Early. The latter thought as Hays, but declined to disobey orders. At the urgent request of General Hays, however, he sent for General Ewell. When the latter arriGeneral Hays, however, he sent for General Ewell. When the latter arrived many precious moments had been lost. But the enemy, who did not see its value until the arrival of Hancock, had not yet appeared in force. General Hays told me ten years after the battle that he could have seized the heights without the loss of ten men. Here we see General Ear convictions told him he should not do so, and refusing to allow General Hays to seize a point recognized by him as of vast importance, becaus
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
ed Hill and Ewell had the attack been continued on the first day? For reasons already explained, I am not prepared to give, historically, the exact numbers, but I will say that there was but one brigade that had not been engaged: Smith's, of Steinwehr's division, which, with one battery remained in reserve on Cemetery Hill; Costar's brigade, of the same division, was sent out to cover the retreat of the Eleventh corps, but was met soon after it emerged from the town by Hoke's and the left of Hays' brigades and repulsed. There is no question but what a combined attack on Cemetery Hill, made within an hour, would have been successful. At the end of an hour the troops had been rallied, occupied strong positions, were covered by stone walls, and under the command and magnetic influence of General Hancock--who in the meantime had reached the field-would, in my opinion, have held the position against any attack from the troops then up. But at 6 o'clock everything was changed; both a