Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Harry Hays or search for Harry Hays in all documents.

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emarked, This indicates a simultaneous movement along the whole line. He at once ordered Colonel Brown to take 100 mounted men, before daylight the next morning, and proceed down the Big Barren River to Bowling Green--about fifty miles by the meanders of the river — examine every ford upon the river, and report to him that night at Bowling Green. Colonel Brown said that he would prefer not to have more than half a dozen men; to which General Johnston replied, Well, as my friend Captain Jack--Hays used to say, on the plains of Texas, when about leaving camp of a morning, looking at his revolvers- Perhaps I will not need you to-day; but, if I do, I will need you damned badly --so with you and the cavalry, Colonel Brown; you may not need them at all; but, if you do, you will need them quick and very badly ; so you had better take them along with you. Colonel Brown accepted the escort, examined the fords, and reported promptly at Bowling Green that night, whither General Johnston had pre
accommodate them. Upon the arrival of the remains at Algiers they were placed by the pallbearers in the ladies' parlor of the depot-building of the Opelousas Railroad, where they were left in charge of Lieutenant John Crowley, who lost a hand at Belmont and an arm at Shiloh, and others who were maimed while serving under the deceased in his last great battle. Among the pall-bearers, besides Beauregard, Bragg, Buckner, and Hood, were Generals Richard Taylor, Longstreet, Gibson, and Harry Hays. All the papers were full of testimonials to the goodness and greatness of the deceased. On the morning of January 24th the Texas committee, consisting of Colonel Ashbel Smith, Hon. D. W. Jones, Hon. M. G. Shelley, and Major Ochiltree, took charge of the remains of General Johnston, and conveyed them by the Opelousas Railroad to Brashear City. At Terrebonne, some fifty ladies, headed by Mrs. Bragg, strewed the coffin with fresh flowers and wreaths, and decorated it with floral emb