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William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 13, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Hazlitt or search for Hazlitt in all documents.

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which they rendered effective service, and participated with honor to themselves and the arm of the service to which they belonged. Among the light batteries of the Regular Army, equally heavy losses occurred in the following famous commands: B - 4th U. S. Artillery - Gibbon's or Stewart's.     K - 4th U. S. Artillery - Derussey's or Seeley's.     I - 1st U. S. Artillery - Ricketts' or Kirby's or Woodruff's. D - 5th U. S. Artillery - Griffin's or Hazlitt's.     C - 5th U. S. Artillery - Seymour's or Ransom's or Weir's. H - 5th U. S. Artillery - Gunther's or Burnham's.     A & C 4th U. S. Artillery - Hazzard's or Cushing's or Thomas'. The foregoing pages show accurately the limit of loss in the various regimental organizations in the civil war. The figures will probably fall below the prevalent idea as to the number killed in certain regiments; but these figures are the only ones that the musterout ro
Captain Easton fell beside a gun at Gaines's Mill, shouting, No! We never surrender, in reply to the demand of the victors to give up his battery. Bates' History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers. At Gettysburg, young Cushing shouts to his general that he will give them one shot more, and falls dead as Pickett's men surge up to the muzzles of his pieces. Of the noted batteries mentioned in the accompanying list of casualties, Kern, Woodruff, Burnham, Hazzard, DeHart, Dimmick, Rorty, Hazlitt, Leppien, McGilvery, Geary (of Knap's), Simonson, Erickson and Whitaker (of Bigelow's)--were killed in action. When closely pressed by a charge of the enemy, the gunners, though unarmed, would often defend their pieces with rammers and handspikes used as clubs. In the charge of the Louisiana Tigers on Ricketts's Pennsylvania Battery, at Cemetery Hill, Gettysburg, one of the assailants fell dead in the battery, killed by a stone which was hurled at him. Some of the light batteries sus