hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 7 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 7 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Hazzard or search for Hazzard in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

ally heavy losses occurred in the following famous commands: B - 4th U. S. Artillery - Gibbon's or Stewart's.     K - 4th U. S. Artillery - Derussey's or Seeley's.     I - 1st U. S. Artillery - Ricketts' or Kirby's or Woodruff's. D - 5th U. S. Artillery - Griffin's or Hazlitt's.     C - 5th U. S. Artillery - Seymour's or Ransom's or Weir's. H - 5th U. S. Artillery - Gunther's or Burnham's.     A & C 4th U. S. Artillery - Hazzard's or Cushing's or Thomas'. The foregoing pages show accurately the limit of loss in the various regimental organizations in the civil war. The figures will probably fall below the prevalent idea as to the number killed in certain regiments; but these figures are the only ones that the musterout rolls will warrant, and no others can be accepted. True, there are many errors in the rolls; but they have been thoroughly revised and corrected. There have been too many careless, ext
, and was killed at his post. Captain Easton fell beside a gun at Gaines's Mill, shouting, No! We never surrender, in reply to the demand of the victors to give up his battery. Bates' History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers. At Gettysburg, young Cushing shouts to his general that he will give them one shot more, and falls dead as Pickett's men surge up to the muzzles of his pieces. Of the noted batteries mentioned in the accompanying list of casualties, Kern, Woodruff, Burnham, Hazzard, DeHart, Dimmick, Rorty, Hazlitt, Leppien, McGilvery, Geary (of Knap's), Simonson, Erickson and Whitaker (of Bigelow's)--were killed in action. When closely pressed by a charge of the enemy, the gunners, though unarmed, would often defend their pieces with rammers and handspikes used as clubs. In the charge of the Louisiana Tigers on Ricketts's Pennsylvania Battery, at Cemetery Hill, Gettysburg, one of the assailants fell dead in the battery, killed by a stone which was hurled at him.