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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
d The Creed of Christendom, to which your account of Newman's could be applied verbatim. It came to me from the author. . . . It is a formidable book, not too long to be popular,—a small 8vo,— nor too learned, but logical, fair-minded, and well written. . . . . He takes ground similar to that of Strauss and Theodore Parker, but still is original to a certain degree. He draws heavily on the Germans, with whom he is evidently at home, and to whom he owes much. . . . . Kindest regards to Lady Head from all of us. Yours faithfully, G. Ticknor. To Sir Charles Lyell. Boston, June 26, 1852. my dear Lyell,—The postponement of your visit to America till the first of September hardly interferes with our satisfaction at the prospect of it, because we cannot, without sacrificing much of the benefit of a summer residence in the country, return before the middle or the 20th of that month . . . . . But you must not cut off from the other end; or rather you must in fairness add to the<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
constant use of this book that has kept us so very exact about Shall and Will, from the Puritan times down. At any rate, we are all right in New England. I never knew a person among us—who was born here, or who was bred in our schools— to make a mistake in the use of these two idiomatic auxiliaries. Indeed, I do not think I hear one once a year, and it is so offensive to me, that I am sure a slight deviation would not escape my notice. Boston, September 14, 1858 Please thank kind Lady Head for transcribing the version of the last elegy of Propertius. Translation by Sir E. Head. It is not very close, yet remarkably phrased, —if I may use such a word,—so as to preserve the air and tone of the original. But I do not know how it is that all the expressions of feeling about death by the ancients—even this one, which is perhaps the best except the Alcestis—are so unsatisfactory. They seem to come out of dismal hollows in the earth, and to be without even that warmth of
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
nging to the hotel on the English side, and facing both the falls. It is, on the whole, I think, the grandest scene known to me, though I dare say there are. grander that I have never visited. . . . . When we first came here, Sir Edmund and Lady Head—who are only four or five hours off by rail—came and made us a visit of a few days, since which we have passed a fortnight with them at Toronto and are not without hopes that they will come to us again before we return home. She is a very char Prince of Wales's own courtesy and good-nature, which is strictly true. Palmerston and Lord John Russell were at the Castle,—the former vigorous enough to walk upwards of three miles with me and Lord St. Germans in the afternoon of Sunday. Lady Head is tolerably well, but she has had a bad cold. We are at Farrance's, near Eaton Square, which is a most comfortable hotel. On Saturday, December 11, we shall be at Oxford, on our way to the West. Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I ex<