Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for Heaton or search for Heaton in all documents.

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pportunely reached the ground. These, with Harper's regiment, constituted a reserve to protect our right flank from an advance of the enemy from the quarter of the stone bridge, and served as a support for the line of battle, which was formed on the right by Bee's and Evans's commands; in the centre by four regiments of Jackson's brigade, with Imbodens' four 6pound-ers, Walton's five guns (two rifled), two guns (one rifled) of Stanard's, and two 6-pounders of Rogers's batteries, under Lieutenant Heaton; and on the left by Gartrell's reduced ranks and Colonel Smith's battalion, subsequently reinforced by Faulkner's 2d Mississippi, and by another regiment of the Army of the Shenandoah, just arrived upon the field, the 6th (Fisher's) North Carolina. Confronting the enemy at this time my forces numbered, at most, not more than six thousand five hundred infantry and artillerists, with but thirteen pieces of artillery, and two companies (Carter's and Hoge's) of Stuart's cavalry. The en
s and Evans's commands, in the centre by four regiments of Jackson's brigade, with Imboden's four 6-pounders, Walton's five guns— two rifled, two guns—one piece rifled—of Stanard's, and two 6-pounders of Rogers's batteries, the latter under Lieutenant Heaton; and on the left by Gartrell's reduced ranks and Colonel Smith's battalion, subsequently reinforced by Faulkner's 2d Mississippi regiment, and by another regiment of the Army of the Shenandoah, just arrived upon the field, the 6th, Fisher's house. Here, as before said, thirteen pieces, mostly 6-pounders, were maintained in action. The several batteries of Imboden, Stanard, Pendleton (Rockbridge Artillery), and Alburtis, of the Army of the Shenandoah, and five guns of Walton's and Heaton's section of Rogers's battery, of the Army of the Potomac, alternating, to some extent, with each other, and taking part as needed; all, from the outset, displaying that marvellous capacity of our people as artillerists, which has made them, it <