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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 87 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 87 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 78 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 64 8 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 43 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 12 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 30 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 24 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 20 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Heintzelman or search for Heintzelman in all documents.

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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
derate right and centre, General McDowell had marched at daybreak with Tyler's, Hunter's, and Heintzelman's divisions, to cross Bull Run at Sudley Ford, two miles and a half above the Warrenton Turnpgade, leading the march, attacked first, and was soon joined by a part of Porter's and one of Heintzelman's regiments. The noise and smoke of the fight were distinctly heard and seen by General Bherman's, and Keyes's brigades, and in danger of being enveloped by the coming into action of Heintzelman's division, he fell back to the position he had first chosen; crossing the broad, open valleye victory was assured, but by no means complete, he urged that the enemy, still on the field (Heintzelman's troops, as subsequently appeared), be warmly pursued, as was successfully done (p. 313). or officers of General McDowell's army gave in their reports the numbers of their troops, General Heintzelman and Colonel Porter: the former led nine thousand five hundred men into battle that day, i
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
the command of the reserve. The Texan Brigade, ever after so distinguished in the Army of Northern Virginia, had then been completed by Brigadier-General Wigfall. A trifling circumstance that occurred at this time was the foundation of a grave accusation, said to have been frequently made against me orally, by Mr. Benjamin, then acting Secretary of War. Major-General Van Dorn reported to me that he had information, from an excellent source, that the left Federal division (General Heintzelman) had advanced so far on the Occoquan road as to be entirely separated from the army-so far that it might be beaten by a prompt attack, before aid could reach it. He proposed that we should take advantage of this exposure, and attack it. I had daily intelligence that contradicted this, but desired General Van Dorn to send one of our best scouts, who belonged to his division, to obtain accurate information, promising that he should make the attempt he suggested should the intelligence b
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
rter's corps, were on and above the railroad, and Heintzelman's and Keyes's below it, and on the Williamsburg rall back upon my first design — that of assailing Heintzelman's and Keyes's corps as soon as, by advancing, theroops that might cross the Chickahominy to assist Heintzelman's and Keyes's corps; or, if none came, he was to hat, although reenforced by Kearney's division of Heintzelman's corps, it was broken, divided, and driven from greater part along the Williamsburg road, to General Heintzelman's intrenched line, two miles from Bottom's Br's corps at Fair Oaks was six miles from those of Heintzelman and Keyes, which were near Bottom's Bridge; but tnday morning, before any aid could have come from Heintzelman, after which his troops, in the condition to whiced, and the battle was over for that day. General Heintzelman, before the same committee, claimed the victo for, being ranking officer, he could have united Heintzelman's and Keyes's corps to his own, and attacked the
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
udley's Spring, and, then turning down to the left, descend the stream and clear away the enemy who may be guarding the lower ford and bridge. It will then bear off to the right, and make room for the succeeding division. The Third Division (Heintzelman's) will march at half-past 2 in the morning, and will follow the road taken by the Second Division, but will cross at the lower ford, after it has been turned as above; and then, going to the left, take place between the stream and Second Diviy the New Kent road, under Major-General Smith; the other by that of the Chickahominy, under Major-General Longstreet. The battle of Williamsburg seems to have prevented the enemy from following from that direction. All the prisoners were of Heintzelman's corps, except a few of the last, who said they belong to Sumner's. Fresh troops seemed to be arriving upon the field continually during the day. Yours, most respectfully, (Signed) J. E. Johnston. General Lee. Headquarters, Cross-Roads,