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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life. You can also browse the collection for Helicon or search for Helicon in all documents.

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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
Sunset and evening Star [Tennyson's Crossing the Bar ], and am ready for whatever comes. On the eve of his eightieth birthday, in 1903, a reception was given to him by the Boston Authors' Club, when Judge Robert Grant read his inspiring verses written for the occasion, and afterwards printed in the Atlantic Monthly, beginning:— Preacher of a liberal creed, Pioneer in Freedom's cause; Ever prompt to take the lead In behalf of saner laws, Still your speech persuasive flows As the brooks of Helicon. You have earned a fair repose, Thomas Wentworth Higginson! This poem Colonel Higginson called one of the greatest laurels I ever won. He thus alluded in his diary to the celebration:— Dec. 21. Evening — an unexpected and elaborate reception by the Authors' Club. There was a series of flattering speeches, of a more headturning description than anything I ever had addressed to me, but they left me happy and humble. After one of the receptions given him by the Grand Army Post which bo<