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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Hellas or search for Hellas in all documents.

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star of constitutional liberty, shining brilliantly as a beacon on the horizon of Europe. Her institutions won respect in the heart of despotic coun tries, compelling the eulogies of Montesquieu and the homage of Voltaire. Never in the history of man had so large a state been blessed with institutions so favorable to public happiness, to the arts of peace, to Chap. XIX.} the development of the natural resources. Of old, Greece, in collision with the East, had spread the civilization of Hellas through Asia Minor and the regions that encircle the Levant; Rome, entering into relations with Greece, as the conqueror of her soil, became imbued with her civilization, and by its sword carried that civilization to the Danube and the Rhine, to Western Europe and to Britain. The destiny of Great Britain was still more grand: her commerce connected her with every quarter of the globe; she sought to make the world a tributary to her industry; and her colonies, her commercial stations, and he