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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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enemy. The losses on our side were as follows: Fourteenth Ohio--killed: Samuel Mills, Company A, shot through the head; Henry Reifeldiver, third sergeant, Company C, killed by cannon shot through left breast. Mortally wounded: Daniel Mills, Company A, in leg — since died; John Kneehouse, Company A, shot in side. Seriously wounded: Henry Murrow, Company B, in side; Casper Sinalf, Company D, in wrist. Slightly wounded: Capt. Fisher, Company C, in face; privates S. Richards, in arm; Richard Henderson, in calf of his leg; orderly Charles Greenwood, along side of his head; William Smith, Company K, buckshot in hip — flesh wound; Lieutenant Sherman, Company K, finger shot off. Several others were slightly scratched. Total: killed, 2; mortally wounded, 2; otherwise wounded, 8; in all, 12. On the other side eight were killed on the field; three died in hospital, and some ten were more or less severely wounded. They carried off many of the wounded in wagons; how many was not known.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eutaw Springs, (search)
Greene moved in two columns, the centre of the first composed of North Carolina militia, with a battalion of South Carolina militia on each flank, commanded Eutaw Springs. respectively by Marion and Pickens. The second consisted of North Carolina regulars, led by General Sumner, on the right; an equal number of Virginians, under Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell, in the centre; and Marylanders, commanded by Col. O. H. Williams, on the left. Lee's Legion covered the right flank, and Lieutenant-Colonel Henderson's troops covered the left. Washington's cavalry and Kirkwood's Delaware troops formed a reserve, and each line had artillery in front. Skirmishing began at eight o'clock in the morning, and very soon the conflict became general and severe. The British were defeated and driven from the field with much loss. The victory was complete, and the winners spread over the British camp, eating, drinking, and plundering. Suddenly and unexpectedly the fugitives rallied and renewed the ba
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Transylvania. (search)
otion in the early part of 1775, efforts were in progress to form a new commonwealth westward of the great mountain ranges in the valley of the Mississippi. Richard Henderson, an energetic lawyer of North Carolina, and a land speculator, induced by the reports of Finley, Boone, and others of the fertile regions on the banks of thed themselves into an Assembly of a State which they named Transylvania by appointing Thomas Slaughter chairman, and Matthew Jewett clerk. They were addressed by Henderson on behalf of the proprietors, between whom and the settlers a compact was made, the most important features of which were an agreement—1. That the election ofhe Continental Congress, but the claim of Virginia to the territory of the new commonwealth was a bar to his admission. The legislature of Virginia afterwards annulled the purchase of Henderson, and the inchoate State disappeared. Virginia gave Henderson a tract of land on the Ohio 12 miles square, below the mouth of Green Rive
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
Bone Lick, near Burlington, visited by James Douglas, of Virginia, who finds on the ground bones of the mastodon......1773 First log-cabin in Kentucky built by James Harrod, at Harrodsburg......1774 Treaty with Cherokees at Wataga, Col. Richard Henderson, Nathaniel Hart, and others acquire, for £ 10,000, the territory between the Ohio, Kentucky, and Cumberland rivers......March 17, 1775 Fort begun on south side of Kentucky River called Boonesboro, and settlements started at Boiling Springs and St. Asaph's, or Fort Logan, in Lincoln county......April, 1775 Under a call of Colonel Henderson, though his purchase was not recognized by Virginia, the people in convention at Boonesboro adopt a proprietary government for their new State of Transylvania and pass laws......May 23, 1775 Simon Kenton and Thomas Williams land at the mouth of Limestone Creek, now Maysville, and plant a corn crop......May, 1775 Daniel Boone and others bring their wives and children into Kentucky.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tennessee, (search)
e rivers from above Nashville down to the Ohio......1766 By treaty at Fort Stanwix the Six Nations cede the country north and east of the Tennessee......Nov. 5, 1768 Capt. William Bean settles on Boone Creek, near Watauga......1769 Company formed to hunt and explore middle Tennessee, with camp at Price's Meadows, Wayne county......1769 Written association formed for the government of the Watauga settlers, and five commissioners appointed as a governing court......1772 Col. Richard Henderson, Nathaniel Hart, and Daniel Boone purchase from the Indians a tract of country between the Kentucky and Cumberland rivers, which they call Transylvania......March 17, 1775 Watauga purchased from the Indians, and deed of conveyance to Charles Robertson executed......March 19, 1775 Watauga settlers march against advancing Cherokees, and disperse them in a battle near Long Island Fort......July 20, 1776 Cherokees under old Abraham attack the fort at Watauga, but are repulsed...
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
ife ; the balmy winds breathed the animating odours of the groves around me. At the return of the morning, by the powerful influence of light, the pulse of nature becomes more active, and the universal vibration of life insensibly and irresistibly moves the wondrous machine. How cheerful and gay all nature appears. In Bartram the feeling for nature is quite as distinct as the idea of the natural man. The social philosophy of the time is more apparent in Cravecoeur. In a letter to Richard Henderson on the subject of immigrants, Washington writes (19 June, 1788): The author of the queries may then be referred to the Information for those who would wish to remove to America, and [sic] published in Europe in the year 1784, by the great philosopher Dr. Franklin. Short as it is, it contains almost everything that needs to be known on the subject of migrating to this country. ... Of books at present existing, Mr. Jefferson's Notes on Virginia will give the best idea of this
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
225, 265 Hamor, Ralph, 17 Hampden, John, 21 Hariot, Thomas, 2 Harris, William Tell, 207 Harte, Bret, 262 Hartford Wits, 164, 169, 170, 172 Hartley, David, 266 Hasty Pudding, 170 Hawkins, Sir, Richard, 2 Hawks of hawk Hollow, the, 222, 311 Hawthorne, 268, 308, 310, 220, 323, 324, 333,355 Hayes, John, 163 Hayman, Robert, 4 Hazlitt, William, 212 Headsman, he, 301 Heamne, James A., 212, 213, 228 Hedge, Frederick Henry, 333 Hell-Fire Club, 112, 113 Henderson, Richard, 198 Henry, Patrick, 144, 146, 236 Henry, William Wirt, 18 n. Heralds' College, 18 Hewson, Mrs., 101 Higginson, Rev., John, 153 Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 341 Hill, G. H., 227 Hilson, 221 Historical collections (Burton), 93 Historical collections of the Indians in New England, 25 Historical review of the Constitution and government of Pennsylvania, an, 97 History of New England (Gookin), 25 History of New England (Hubbard), 25, 27 History of New
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
. C. John W. McCormick,Zzz=Co. C. Samuel Spiggle,,Zzz=Co. C. Corporal John M. McIntyre,Co. D. Priv'te F. H. Pike,Co. E. Geo. Weddle,Zzz=Co. E. M. Herbert,Zzz=Co. E. M. Hotsenpiller,Zzz=Co. E. R. Lindemood,Zzz=Co. E. G. B. Lindemood,Zzz=Co. E. W. Peregry,Zzz=Co. E. W. Turner,Zzz=Co. E. Sergeant J. W. Ryder,Co. G. Private E. H. Campbell,Zzz=Co. G. Wm. L. Keerl,Zzz=Co. G. Robt. D. Keerl,Zzz=Co. G. Wm. M. Sheetz,Zzz=Co. G. John Lindemood,Zzz=Co. G. Alex. Beard,Zzz=Co. G. Richard Henderson,Zzz=Co. G. Wm. Beall,Zzz=Co. G. Samuel Carrier.Zzz=Co. G. Sergeant Jos. G. McWilliams,Co. H. Private Jacob J. Sharff,Zzz=Co. H. Joseph D. Hicks,Zzz=Co. H. Wm. Melvin,Zzz=Co. H. Private Edward Hooper,Co. D. Joseph Hill,Zzz=Co. D. Wm. J. Hill,Zzz=Co. D. A. M. Hamrick,Zzz=Co. D. D. W. Armentrout,Co. E. J. Bowman,Zzz=Co. E. John Criswoll,Zzz=Co. E. James Dean,Zzz=Co. E. M. O'Connell,Zzz=Co. E. Priv'te J. R. Shipe,Co. I. O. A. Jones,Zzz=Co. I. Robert W. Dixon,Co. K. M