Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for T. A. Hendricks or search for T. A. Hendricks in all documents.

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false, and malicious slander on eleven States represented on this floor. That Congress had no jurisdiction over the subject, no more in this District than in the State of South Carolina. After a long and spirited debate, mainly by Southern senators, Mr. Calhoun's motion to reject was defeated by a vote to receive the petition — Yeas 35, Nays 10, as follows: Yeas: Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing of Illinois, Ewing of Ohio, Goldsborough, Grundy, Hendricks, Hill, Hubbard, Kent, King of Alabama, King of Georgia, Knight, Linn, McKean, Morris, Naudain, Niles, Prentiss, Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Shepley, Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall, Webster, Wright. Nays: Messrs. Black, Calhoun, Cuthbert, Leigh, Moore, Nicholas, Porter, Preston, Walker, White. In the House, February 5, 1836. Mr. Henry L. Pinckney, of South Carolina, submitted the following resolve: Resolved, That all the memorials which have been offered, or
after the disruption there, things were bravely altered. Maine, early in September, elected a Republican Governor by 18,091 majority; Vermont directly followed, with a Republican majority of 22,370; but when Pennsylvania and Indiana, early in October, declared unmistakably for Lincoln — the former choosing Andrew G. Curtin her Governor by 32,164 majority over Henry D. Foster, who had the hearty support of all three opposing parties; while Indiana chose Gen. Henry S. Lane by 9,757 over T. A. Hendricks, his only competitor, with seven out of eleven Representatives in Congress, and a Republican Legislature — it was manifest that only a miracle could prevent the success of Lincoln and Hamlin the next month. Yet the mercantile fears of convulsion and civil war, as results of Mr. Lincoln's election, were so vivid and earnest that the contest at the North was still prosecuted by his combined adversaries with the energy of desperation. New York, especially, was the arena of a struggle a
eds Johnson, as Provisional Governor, 617. Hawkins, Capt., at Fredericktown, Mo., 591. Hawkins, Col., (Union,) 600. Hawkins, Jn., the first English slave-trader, 28. Hayne, Col., sent to W. by Gov. Pickens, 412. Hayne, Robert Y., 86; 93. Hazelhurst, Isaac, speech at the Philadelphia Peace meeting. 366. Hazlitt, with Brown, 298; is executed, 199. Heintzelman, Gen. S. P., wounded at Bull Run, 545; official report of the battle, 546; 551. Helper, Hinton R., 304. Hendricks, T. A., of Ind., beaten by Lane, 326. Henry, Alex., Mayor of Philadelphia; calls a Peace meeting, 362; his speech, 363; his prohibition of G. W. Curtis, 367; 406. Henry, Gustavus A., a Commissioner from Tennessee to the Confederacy, 482. Henry, Patrick, 33; 42; speech against consolidation of Federal power, etc., 81. Herkimer, N. Y., Dem. Convention at, 166. Hickory point, Ks., Free-State meeting at, 242. Hicks, Gov. Thos. H., of Md., refuses to convene his Legislature,