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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
ion and notes by R. A. Brock, Corresponding Secretary and Librarian of the Society. Vol. 1. [Seal of the Society.] Richmond, Va. Published by the Society. Mdccclxxxii. Proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society, with the address of Wm. Wirt Henry on the early settlement of Virginia. February 24, 1882. We have just received the above from the Secretary, R. A. Brock, Esq., and have only space now to congratulate the Society on preserving this valuable material, on the skilful editined the above from the Secretary, R. A. Brock, Esq., and have only space now to congratulate the Society on preserving this valuable material, on the skilful editing which Mr. Brock has done, and on the tasteful and beautiful manner in which the printer (W. Ellis Jones, Richmond), has done his work. We will hereafter show the historic value of the Spottswood Letters, and give some specimens of the able and conclusive manner in which Mr. Henry has vindicated the truth of early Virginia history.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
housand ounces of gold, worth $134,000, missed from the United States mint at Philadelphia, in a vault not opened since 1887. The money was stolen by weigh-clerk H. S. Cochran, who restores $107,000......Sept. 14, 1893 Cherokee outlet, Oklahoma, opened to settlement under proclamation of the President, Aug. 19, 1893; 100,000 persons make a rush for the 6,000,000 acres of land......Sept. 16, 1893 Centennial of the laying of the cornerstone of the Capitol celebrated at Washington; William Wirt Henry, of Virginia, chief orator......Sept. 18, 1893 Destructive storm on the Gulf of Mexico; over 2,000 lives lost along the coast, with a large loss of property on......Oct. 2, 1893 Pan-American Bimetallic Convention meets at St. Louis......Oct. 3, 1893 Tucker bill to repeal the federal election laws passes the House by 201 to 102; not voting, fifty......Oct. 10, 1893 Senate sits continuously to force a vote on the repeal bill, from 11 A. M. Wednesday, Oct. 11, to 1.45 A. M. Fr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
ate constitution adopted, and colonial government ceases in Virginia......June 29, 1776 Kentucky made a county of Virginia......1776 Henry Clay born in The Slashes, Hanover county......April 12, 1777 Maj. George Rogers Clarke sent by Governor Henry with an expedition against the British fort at Kaskaskia (now in Illinois), and captures it......July 4, 1778 He also occupies Vincennes......August, 1778 All territory northwest of the Ohio River occupied by Clarke is made by the Virgifederacy, dies at Narraganset Pier......Sept. 18, 1898 The Dismal Swamp opened......Oct. 14, 1899 Memorial to Winnie Davis, the Daughter of the Confederacy, unveiled at Richmond, Va.......Nov. 8, 1899 The fence law declared constitutional......February, 1900 Ex-Gov. Henry H. Wells dies at Palmyra, N. Y.......Feb. 12, 1900 Monument to the Confederate dead unveiled at Charles City......Nov. 21, 1900 William Wirt Henry, historian, dies at Richmond......Dec. 5, 1900 Washington
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the historians, 1607-1783 (search)
lege in London. The criticism Its most notable champion is Mr. Lewis L. Kropf, who asserts that when he communicated a copy of Smith's patent to the Hungarian Heraldic Society it was received with an outburst of laughter. Mr. Kropf pronounces Smith an impudent forger. See Kropf, Lewis L., Captain John Smith of Virginia, notes and Queries, London, 1890, Seventh Series, vol. IX; also American historical review, vol. III, p. 737. A series of letters by the Rev. Edward D. Neill and William Wirt Henry, beginning in the Richmond Dispatch, 12 July, 1877, and continuing through several weeks, threshed out this controversy without settling anything. is very sweeping. If it is well taken our historian degenerated in the latter part of his career to a literary mountebank, but the matter may still await a more judicious investigation than it has yet received. Turning from Virginia For the works of the early minor Virginia historians see the Bibliography. we shall not find any consid
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
homas, 2 Harris, William Tell, 207 Harte, Bret, 262 Hartford Wits, 164, 169, 170, 172 Hartley, David, 266 Hasty Pudding, 170 Hawkins, Sir, Richard, 2 Hawks of hawk Hollow, the, 222, 311 Hawthorne, 268, 308, 310, 220, 323, 324, 333,355 Hayes, John, 163 Hayman, Robert, 4 Hazlitt, William, 212 Headsman, he, 301 Heamne, James A., 212, 213, 228 Hedge, Frederick Henry, 333 Hell-Fire Club, 112, 113 Henderson, Richard, 198 Henry, Patrick, 144, 146, 236 Henry, William Wirt, 18 n. Heralds' College, 18 Hewson, Mrs., 101 Higginson, Rev., John, 153 Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 341 Hill, G. H., 227 Hilson, 221 Historical collections (Burton), 93 Historical collections of the Indians in New England, 25 Historical review of the Constitution and government of Pennsylvania, an, 97 History of New England (Gookin), 25 History of New England (Hubbard), 25, 27 History of New England, a (Withrop), 22, 23 n. History of New Jersey,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
ginian precursors of enlightenment. The original title of a dignified body, which I have for years striven to serve, was the Virginia Historical and Philosophical Society. It was organized December 29, 1831, with Chief-Justice Marshall as its first president. It is honored now in a triumvirate of directive officers, whom Richmond values for their excellences. The second of these is your own loved president, the chief herald of the cause of education in our teeming republic. The Hon. William Wirt Henry and Colonel Archer Anderson hold the first and third trusts. Since 1870 the essential exponent of our State has been known more simply as the Virginia Historical Society, having relegated then philosophy to the dreamer. It had a predecessor in imposing name more than half a century before—the Philosophical Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge—instituted at the ambrosial capital of the Old Dominion—Williamsburg—in the month of flowers—May, 1773. I may recur to it aga
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
Rev R. C., 246. Frazier's Farm, Battle of, 306. Fredericksburg, Battle of, 259, 262, 310. Free Schools in Colonial Virginia, 138. Gaines's Mill, Battle of, 417. Gift, Lt. George W., 95. Gregg, Fort, Artillery defenders of, 65. Gregg. General Maxcy, death of, 309. Gordon, General John B., 176. Hardee, General W. J., 235. Harman, Colonel A. W., 318. Harrison, Captain, Dabney Carr, 372. Hartford, The U. S., Naval Ship, 73. Heckman, Capture of General, 107. Henry, Wm. Wirt, 125. Hill, Lieutenant-General A. P., Reminiscences of, 178; First burial of remains of, 183; wife, of, 267. Hill, Senator B. H., 374, 387. Hill, General D. H., Report of the Battle of Bethel, 232. Hill, G. Powell, 186, Hines, A Howitzer Veteran, Old, 257. Home Guard of Richmond, in 1861, 57. Indentured Servants in Virginia, 138. Inflexible, The British Iron-Clad, Description of, 32 Iron, Manufacture in Virginia, Early, 137. Jackson, General Thomas J., Character
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
iculars of each of these artillery commands would be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the statement that this command was founded in 1776, and served during the war for independence; it was on duty at the siege of Charleston, and of course, was included in the surrender of May, 1780. The commanders from 1776-1865 have been Captains Burke, Henry, Grayson Zealy, George P. Elliott, B. J. Johnson, J. G. Barnwell, Stephen Elliott, Jr., H. M. Stuart. In the early days of this organization its services were presumably for heavy artillery, a similar organization existing in Charleston at the same period, and now maintained only as a social one, The Charleston Ancient Artillery. As far back as present memories go, the company had field pieces, but did not use horses. The light battery gun drill was kept up, and the members were familia
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Memorial. (search)
take place in the Academy of Music. And so, on that occasion that spacious edifice was crowded to overflowing with an audience thoroughly representative of the worth and intelligence of the city and country, and, among the distinguished people occupying seats on the platform were the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor of the State, the Mayor of the city, and representatives of the various religious denominations. Governor McKinney presided, and addresses of congratulation were made by the Hon. W. W. Henry; Rev. John Hall, D. D., of New York; Rt.—Rev. A. W. Wilson, D. D., of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; Hon. J. L. M Curry, Ll. D., of the Baptist Church; Rt.—Rev. A. M. Randolph, of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Virginia; Rev. R. P. Kerr, D. D., of the Southern Presbyterian Church, and the following also had voice in the programme of the evening: Rev. H. C. Alexander, D. D., Rev. J. Calvin Stewart, Governor McKinney Lieutenant-Governor J. Hoge Tyler, Colonel C. R. Barksdale
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hon. James Mercer Garnett. (search)
wise thing, or gave a bad vote. (See Bouldin's Reminiscences of John Randolph. Appendix.) An interesting correspondence between Mr. Randolph and Mr. Garnett of some 340 letters has been preserved, extending from 1806 to 1832, the year before Mr. Randolph's death. The originals of these letters are at Elmwood, and a copy is in my possession. In August, 1807, Mr. Garnett served as a member of the grand jury that indicted Aaron Burr, of which jury Mr. Randolph was the foreman. Mr. William Wirt Henry, in his address before the Virginia State Bar Association, August 3, 1897, on The Trial of Aaron Burr, calls this the most distinguished grand jury that was ever impaneled. (See Virginia Law Register, Vol. III, pages 477– 492.) Mr. Garnett served again in the Virginia Legislature during the session of 1824-25, and was a member of the Convention of 1829– 30, called to amend the State Constitution. He opposed many of the changes in the Constitution made by that Convention, and wa