hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 73 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 16 6 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 12 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Guy V. Henry or search for Guy V. Henry in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 3 document sections:

force immediately charged and captured seventeen wagons, one hundred mules, and twenty-six prisoners. The enemy were then within four miles of our force, and General Vance at once started out with the captured property. This was about three P. M. The General thought it was impossible to get back over the Smoky Mountain, and endeavored to make his way to the Cattaloocha road, on the head of Cosby Creek. He immediately despatched to Thomas (who was the senior officer in command) to send Colonel Henry, with the balance of the command and artillery, by the road around the base of the mountain, to meet him on Cosby. The force with General Vance travelled that night until twelve o'clock, when they found the road in their front blockaded. They then had to lay by until daylight, when they cut out the blockade, and reached Cosby about one P. M.; but, instead of finding Henry there, they found a despatch from him saying that, upon consultation with Colonel L. Thomas, he had concluded the r
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
The columns travelled by different routes, Colonel Henry's taking a road at the right of the main rnoissance. I was fortunate enough to join Colonel Henry's column at the outset, and more fortunateame space of time. It was quite dark when Colonel Henry left thethree-mile point; but notwithstandflight and scatter two hundred men was not Colonel Henry's object, especially when he knew of artild fifteen minutes notice of our approach. Colonel Henry, having satisfied himself of the state of front of Captain Elder's flying artillery. Colonel Henry and Major Stevens placed themselves at theels at Finnigan did not dare to follow us. Colonel Henry proceeded a distance of ten miles, before d, the railroad is crossed several times. Colonel Henry made every effort to capture a train of cae top of a tree, struck the ground between Colonel Henry's feet. Colonel Henry, now familiar with lars is the fruit of the success. To Colonel Guy V. Henry and his command, the battalion of Massa[14 more...]
. Mary's, and, if necessary, to bring back Colonel Henry to the latter place. On the twelfth, Gehe south fork of the St. Mary's as soon as Colonel Henry, whom he had ordered back from the front, aldwin as directed. He had, however, sent Colonel Henry toward the left to capture some railroad tes and Fifty-fourth Massachusetts colored; Colonel Henry, the cavalry and Elder's battery, and Captarlor. Before reaching the battle-ground, Colonel Henry, with his cavalry of the Independent Massaced in several places and his horse shot. Colonel Henry had three horses shot, but himself escaped, no panic, nothing that indicated hurry. Colonel Henry, with his cavalry, brought up the rear. Aroad. The Fortieth Massachusetts cavalry, Colonel Henry, the Independent battalion, Major Stevens,h regiment Massachusetts mounted infantry, Colonel Henry; the Independent battalion of Massachusettor Stevens; the mounted infantry, under Colonel Guy V. Henry; the Seventh Connecticut, Colonel Hawle[3 more...]